Sunday 31 January 1668/69

(Lord’s day). Lay long talking with pleasure, and so up and I to church, and there did hear the Doctor that is lately turned Divine, I have forgot his name, I met him a while since at Sir D. Gawden’s at dinner, Dr. Waterhouse; He preaches in a devout manner of way, not elegant nor very persuasive, but seems to mean well, and that he would preach holily; and was mighty passionate against people that make a scoff of religion. And, the truth is, I did observe Mrs. Hollworthy smile often, and many others of the parish, who, I perceive, have known him, and were in mighty expectation of hearing him preach, but could not forbear smiling, and she particularly upon me, and I on her. So home to dinner: and before dinner to my Office, to set down my journal for this week, and then home to dinner; and after dinner to get my wife and boy, one after another, to read to me: and so spent the afternoon and the evening, and so after supper to bed. And thus endeth this month, with many different days of sadness and mirth, from differences between me and my wife, from her remembrance of my late unkindness to her with Willet, she not being able to forget it, but now and then hath her passionate remembrance of it as often as prompted to it by any occasion; but this night we are at present very kind. And so ends this month.

7 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I to church, and there did hear the Doctor that is lately turned Divine"

THIS Edward Waterhouse was in fact not a doctor but an author and FRS. [ Royal Society records show he was made a Fellow 29/07/1663 and is identified as a clergyman. ] Pepys confuses him with his kinsman of the same name who was made M.D. at Oxford in 1651 by mandate from Cromwell in recognition of work as an army physician in Ireland. (L&M Companion)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“I to church, and there did hear the [author] that is lately turned Divine” would be correct: this Edward Waterhouse took orders in 1668. (L&M Companion)

Jim   Link to this

Edward Waterhouse has a listing in the 1909 edition of the “Dictionary of National Biography”. In it he is described as “a cock-brained man”, and as “a fantastical preacher”. Both of these statements are quotes from Anthony Wood, and they are repeated in the “Jstor” citation given by Terry.
The DNB article can be found at > >

http://books.google.com/books?id=xS88AAAAIAAJ&p...

Eric   Link to this

BBC radio 4 This week: womans hour drama: Pepys Diary dramatised - or listen again

Claire   Link to this

"...but could not forbear smiling, and she particularly upon me, and I on her."

And I can't help but note this. Despite his best intentions, Sam does love the attention of the opposite sex, doesn't he?

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"I to church, and there did hear the Doctor that is lately turned Divine, I have forgot his name, I met him a while since at Sir D. Gawden’s at dinner, Dr. Waterhouse;"

Forgets his name, then supplies it 11 words later after recalling when he first met him. Perhaps an example of the speed with which Samuel wrote?

By the way, "Doctor" doesn't necessarily signify medico; it could be used of any learned man, and Terry notes that Waterhouse had been awarded the degree of Legum Doctor.

Sean Adams   Link to this

I met him a while since at Sir D. Gawden’s at dinner, Dr. Waterhouse

This will give a small thrill to any fan of Neil Stephenson's Baroque Cycle: Daniel Waterhouse is the principal character - and he meets up with Pepys in the books - about 12 years younger than Sam.

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