Saturday 16 May 1668

Up; and to the Office, where we sat all the morning; and at noon, home with my people to dinner; and thence to the Office all the afternoon, till, my eyes weary, I did go forth by coach to the King’s playhouse, and there saw the best part of “The Sea Voyage,” where Knepp I see do her part of sorrow very well. I afterwards to her house; but she did not come presently home; and there je did kiss her ancilla, which is so mighty belle; and I to my tailor’s, and to buy me a belt for my new suit against to-morrow; and so home, and there to my Office, and afterwards late walking in the garden; and so home to supper, and to bed, after Nell’s cutting of my hair close, the weather being very hot.

4 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

16th May, 1668. Sir Richard Edgecombe, of Mount Edgecombe, by Plymouth, my relation, [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Edgcumbe_(... ] came to visit me; a very virtuous and worthy gentleman.

http://is.gd/nPP3F0

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Ossory
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 16 May 1668

The answer to Lord Ossory's letters of 4th and 5th instant is, in short, that the King resolves to keep to himself whatsoever shall hereafter fall to the Crown - at least till he be out of debt. ...

The retrenchment so long spoken of, & so much feared, in Ireland was, it is said, kept back for the writer to advise upon it. It would be reasonable that Ireland should bear its own charge ... whether by raising the revenue to the charge; or by sinking the charge to the revenue ... is matter for consideration. ...

Since writing thus far, Ossory's letter of the 9th came to hand. ... Without the imprest therein mentioned ... the Duke could not have made this voyage, which is as useful to the King, as it can be to private concernments. ...
_____

Petition for Thomas Deling, agent to Sir William Penn, to the Duke of Ormond
Written from: Dublin
Date: 16 May 1668

Recites the "chequing" of Sir William Penn's pay ... "since the last of March 1667", by the Muster-Master of the Army of Ireland.

Sir W. Penn is employed in his Majesty's service & by his Majesty's command in England. It is therefore prayed that the Cheque aforesaid may be taken off.

[With the Order of the Lord Deputy, Earl of Ossory, thereupon.]

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Christopher Squire   Link to this

Re: ' . . and there je did kiss her ancilla, . . '

'ancilla'= maid

Gary J. Bivin   Link to this

Re: ’ . . and there je did kiss her ancilla, . . ‘

‘ancilla’= maid

Thanks for the translation. I had all sorts of provocative mental images!

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