Tuesday 21 August 1666

Up, and to the office, where much business and Sir W. Coventry there, who of late hath wholly left us, most of our business being about money, to which we can give no answer, which makes him weary of coming to us. He made an experiment to-day, by taking up a heape of petitions that lay upon the table. They proved seventeen in number, and found them thus: one for money for reparation for clothes, four desired to have tickets made out to them, and the other twelve were for money. Dined at home, and sister Balty with us. My wife snappish because I denied her money to lay out this afternoon; however, good friends again, and by coach set them down at the New Exchange, and I to the Exchequer, and there find my business of my tallys in good forwardness. I passed down into the Hall, and there hear that Mr. Bowles, the grocer, after 4 or 5 days’ sickness, is dead, and this day buried. So away, and taking up my wife, went homewards. I ‘light and with Harman to my mercer’s in Lumbard Streete, and there agreed for, our purple serge for my closett, and so I away home. So home and late at the office, and then home, and there found Mr. Batelier and his sister Mary, and we sat chatting a great while, talking of witches and spirits, and he told me of his own knowledge, being with some others at Bourdeaux, making a bargain with another man at a taverne for some clarets, they did hire a fellow to thunder (which he had the art of doing upon a deale board) and to rain and hail, that is, make the noise of, so as did give them a pretence of undervaluing their merchants’ wines, by saying this thunder would spoil and turne them. Which was so reasonable to the merchant, that he did abate two pistolls per ton for the wine in belief of that, whereas, going out, there was no such thing. This Batelier did see and was the cause of to his profit, as is above said. By and by broke up and to bed.

14 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"I ‘light and with Harman to my mercer’s in Lumbard Streete, and there agreed for, our purple serge for my closett, ..."

Onward and upward; SP is using the professional talents of an upholsterer, the contemporary equivalent of an interior decorator.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

And not long after the expenditure on purple for his closet: "My wife snappish because I denied her money to lay out this afternoon;" I won't go there.

cgs   Link to this

"Here you are dear, take this tally, do not spend it all"
Samuell was so lucky that his banker friends did not have debit cards for issue. Just cash on the barrel

This place be 17C version of Harrods of the 21st C.
"...and by coach set them down at the New Exchange,..."

cgs   Link to this

it smells of a weagie board? "...(which he had the art of doing upon a deale board)..."
deale board
= DEAL n.3 1; a thin board of fir or pine.
1568-9 in Burgon Life Gresham II. 284 One shippe of Brydges [Bruges] in Flanders, in the which is mastes, clappe-borde, deel-bordes.
1583 in Northern N. & Q. I. 77 A new cheste of Deal-bourd.
1667 PRIMATT City & C. Build. 146 Deal-Boards from ten to twelve inches broad, and about ten foot long.

1722 DE FOE Plague (1884) 99 Doors having Deal-Boards nail'd over them.

cgs   Link to this

weegie ouija[Origin uncertain.
The word has been variously explained as (a) < French oui OUI adv. + German ja yes (see YEA adv.), (b) < an ancient Egyptian word for ‘good luck’ (although apparently no such word exists), and (c) < the name of Oujda, the name of a city in Morocco.]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouija

cgs   Link to this

maji?
"...They did hire a fellow to thunder (which he had the art of doing upon a deale board) and to rain and hail, that is, make the noise of, so as did give them a pretence of undervaluing their merchants’ wines, by saying this thunder would spoil and turne them...."

cheap skating?

cape henry   Link to this

Purple surge all in his brain? Lately Pepys just don't seem the same. He's got money, but none for Liz - just enough for the tally biz...

With apologies - it's Friday.

Bryan M   Link to this

"My wife snappish because I denied her money to lay out this afternoon"

Let's not be too hasty here about the outcome. The second part of the sentence reads: "however, good friends again, and by coach set them down at the New Exchange ..."

The New Exchange contains "a walk above, and rows of shops over that, filled chiefly with milliners, sempstresses, and the like".

Sounds like the ladies might have had a win this time.

Bryan M   Link to this

Weegie board, smeegie board

Batelier's Bourdeaux thunderer was clearly one of Rolf Harris' ancestors.
See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag8B9kQjv_0

(apologies to those who have not previously been exposed to the incomparable Rolf and are easily shocked)

Robin Peters   Link to this

Too true Bryan. Methinks our Salty has gone up a blind alley this time to assume this was a weagie board when it obviously was a wobble board, used off stage to create sound effect of thunder or cannon fire. (Weagie board used to summon spirits from the other side)

ONeville   Link to this

The wine merchant was probably happy to come down two pistolls a ton (are we talking about 1000 litres?) having upped the price by that much in case of haggling. The 'board wobbler' would also have to be paid; good wobblers don't come cheap!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hmmn...Sam ponders.

Wonder if that "thunder" damage might work elsewhere...

"Why, yes, Mr. P...I would gladly lower the price of Mrs. Pepys' gown owing to that strange rumble of thunder, despite the clear sky..." Unthankes nods blandly... "...except that I already write 'thunder' insurance into my low, low prices."

Bess rolling eyes...

***

"'Thunder' damage to the latest supply of Tangier biscuit, eh, Pepys?" Gauden frowns. "Well, naturally, the price will be lowered...As will your 'commission' to make up."

"Uh...Perhaps I should re-examine the biscuit supply." Sam notes.

***

"Of course you understand my dear niece..." Uncle Wight notes, beaming at the reopening of 'negotiations' which a fuming...Skinflint bastard of a wandering-eyed husband...Bess has permitted.

"...should external conditions say, such as 'thunder', at the most inappropriate moment intervene to affect successful completion of our endeavor, I would naturally expect a discount..."

"You've been talking to Sam'l recently, haven't you?"

cgs   Link to this

1 pistolle was equivalent to 10 L.s.d. Francaise:

Re : re sounding board: ouija not known at this time but con artists were. Clap boards then were used to make the wine barrels.

cgs   Link to this

skinflint
was it said or written at this time ?????
OED
One who would skin a flint to save or gain something; an avaricious, penurious, mean or niggardly person; a miser.
a1700 B. E. Dict. Cant. Crew, Skin-flint, a griping,..close-fisted Fellow.

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