Monday 4 February 1660/61

Early up to Court with Sir W. Pen, where, at Mr. Coventry’s chamber, we met with all our fellow officers, and there after a hot debate about the business of paying off the Fleet, and how far we should join with the Commissioners of Parliament, which is now the great business of this month more to determine, and about which there is a great deal of difference between us, and then how far we should be assistants to them therein. That being done, he and I back again home, where I met with my father and mother going to my cozen Snow’s to Blackwall, and had promised to bring me and my wife along with them, which we could not do because we are to go to the Dolphin to-day to a dinner of Capt. Tayler’s. So at last I let my wife go with them, and I to the tavern, where Sir William Pen and the Comptroller and several others were, men and women; and we had a very great and merry dinner; and after dinner the Comptroller begun some sports, among others the naming of people round and afterwards demanding questions of them that they are forced to answer their names to, which do make very good sport. And here I took pleasure to take the forfeits of the ladies who would not do their duty by kissing of them; among others a pretty lady, who I found afterwards to be wife to Sir W. Batten’s son.

Home, and then with my wife to see Sir W. Batten, who could not be with us this day being ill, but we found him at cards, and here we sat late, talking with my Lady and others and Dr. Whistler, who I found good company and a very ingenious man. So home and to bed.

11 Annotations

Eric Walla   Link to this

OK, let's get this straight ...

... first he kisses Sir W. Batten's daughter-in-law, then hot-foots it over to Sir Batten's house. Now was this prearranged, did he miss his company at the dinner or did Sam feel the need to gather more information about the pretty young thing?

Emilio   Link to this

"how far we should join with the Commissioners of Parliament . . ."

The L&M version of the second half of this sentence flows better than what's above; Wheatley's variations are in brackets:

". . . how far we should join with the Commissioners of Parliament (which is now the great business of this month [and] more to determine, and about which there is a great deal of difference between us and them ['us, and then' in Wheatley] how far we shall be assistant[s] to them) therein."

'Us and them' in particular is much more natural than Wheatley's phrasing.

Emilio   Link to this

"take the forfeits of the ladies who [c]ould not do their duty"

That's the L&M transcription, which gives a different idea of the ladies; perhaps not all of them were playing to lose . . .

Bradford   Link to this

"the naming of people round and afterwards demanding questions of them that they are forced to answer their names to, which do make very good sport."

Come, then, party animals: explain to us shy folks how to play this Fun Game.

daniel   Link to this

among others a pretty lady....

First he kisses (presumably) the wife of the son of Sir Batten as well as joining in other shinanigans then goes to Sir B's house to see whether the cost is clear. i suspect that we see more of this type of behavior with our Sam as time goes by.

Pauline   Link to this

"Come, then, party animals: explain to us shy folks how to play this Fun Game"

I guess we would give you a name; lets say Bottom. Then we would ask you questions for which you would say the name as the answer.

Where did you graduate in your class?
What are you scratching?
If it's all bunk, do you have a preference?

Other questions for Mr. Bottom?

daniel   Link to this

that is a very funny game-must try it some time! no wonder that the ladies were abashed.

J A Gioia   Link to this

the name game

i'm wondering if it would have included names notorious in gossipy london; members of the r.f. or courtiers. too risky perhaps?

Brad W   Link to this

Other questions for Mr. Bottom?

What was left of Charles I when they were through with him?

mary   Link to this

Pauline's guess at the nature of the name game

reminds me of the old, playground teaser:

Q. Adam and Eve and Pinchme
Went down to the river to bathe.
Adam and Eve were drowned.
Who do you think was saved?

A. (from the unwary) Pinchme.

Rich Reitz   Link to this

Is 'The Dolphin' the same as todays place? I have never been to England and just wondering..

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