Monday 24 December 1660

In the morning to the office and Commissioner Pett (who seldom comes there) told me that he had lately presented a piece of plate (being a couple of flaggons) to Mr. Coventry, but he did not receive them, which also put me upon doing the same too; and so after dinner I went and chose a payre of candlesticks to be made ready for me at Alderman Backwell’s. To the office again in the afternoon till night, and so home, and with the painters till 10 at night, making an end of my house and the arch before my door, and so this night I was rid of them and all other work, and my house was made ready against to-morrow being Christmas day. This day the Princess Royal died at Whitehall.

10 Annotations

PHE   Link to this

The telling of time
By what means would Sam Have known it was 10 at night? By the bells of a nearby church, or by a clock on his mantlepiece?

Brian G McMullen   Link to this

The telling of time.

Actually, the technology seems to be well on the move by the mid 1600's. SP is probably as accurate with time as most of us are with our !@^$#&%^$ fangled digital display devices.

The Clockmakers' Company is an active City of London craft guild or "Livery Company". It was founded under a Royal Charter of King Charles I in 1631. The charter's first statement is:

That a body should be set up for ever, "by the name of the Master, Wardens, and Fellowship of the Art or Mystery of Clockmaking of the City of London", to include all English-born clockmakers, whether freemen or not, who live within the City, or a radius of ten miles around it.

More information will be posted under the Science and Technology heading.

Brian G McMullen   Link to this

So who has paid for all this work?

I am beginning to believe that the 'government' is spending lots of money on SP's pet project. My reason is he has not once mentioned how much this is costing him. SP and his money are not parted easily and I believe he would have had a word or two about cost overruns by this point.

vincent   Link to this

Telling of time: SP does tell us on 16th jan 1660
"...staid up till the bell-man came by with his bell just under my window as I was writing of this very line, and cried, "Past one of the clock, and a cold, frosty, windy morning." ..."

Another method was by bells [1 to 8 ea 1/2 hr]now that he is in a navy establishment with some old salts-[tars] they would have a man do the 'onors for a mere 1/4d.
Also another possibility that there were some clock towers around, and bells from some of the churches did strike a few bells, to announce the hour of curfew . Mundane things like time, was not of the essence[?tempus fugit]. The Churches did strike to call the faithful to fill the pews { 'tis why he was always available and on time for a little light listening on the dull days: the bells tolled} and bells tell of other notable events.
see fri nov 21 for bell navy connection

vincent   Link to this

"... Commissioner Pett (who seldom comes there) told me that he had lately presented a piece of plate (being a couple of flaggons) to Mr. Coventry, but he did not receive them, which also put me upon doing the same too; and so after dinner I went and chose a payre of candlesticks to be made ready for me at Alderman Backwell's …”
Benefits are acceptable, while the receiver thinks he may return them; but once exceeding that, hatred is given instead of thanks.
[Lat., Beneficia usque eo laeta sunt dum videntur exsolvi posse; ubi multum antevenere pro gratia odium redditur.]
- Tacitus (Caius Cornelius Tacitus), Annales (IV, 18)
To accept a favor is to sell one’s freedom.
[Lat., Beneficium accipere, libertatem est vendere.]
- Syrus (Publilius Syrus), Maxims

jamie yeager   Link to this

Who paid?
It's been mentioned earlier that the Navy owns the house, and that workmen from Deptford dockyard had performed most of the structural/carpentry/joinery around the place. Interior decoration case is not clear, but on evidence of Sam not complaining about the price of gilt, leather, paint, wall hangings, etc, suspect Navy labor as well.

Terry F   Link to this

Act abolishing Relics of Feudalism and Fixing an Excise

(1660. December 24. 12 Charles II c. 24. 5 S. R. 259.)

[Short title: Tenures Abolition Act 1660] http://home.freeuk.net/don-aitken/ast/c2.html#222

[441] The end of the strictly feudal period of English land law came in 1660, when Tenures Abolition Act 1660 abolished most of the remaining incidents of tenure.
The Act converted all tenures into free and common socage, and prohibited other types of tenure being created in future.
It also abolished all incidents of value, except forfeiture and escheat.
Socage tenure was not affected, except by the abolition of incidents (of which aids had been the only one in any way burdensome). http://mysite.dingley.net/samfred/property-righ...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

In Lords chamber

Bills passed. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

"An Act for taking away the Court of Wards and Liveries, and Tenures in Capite, and by Knights Service, and Purveyance, and for settling a Revenue upon His Majesty in Lieu thereof."

To which the Clerk of the Parliament pronounced the Royal Assent, in these Words:

"Le Roy le veult."

"An Act for a Grant of certain Impositions upon Beer and Ale, and other Liquors, for the Increase of His Majesty's Revenue, during His Life."

The Clerk of the Parliament pronounced the Royal Assent, in these Words:

"Le Roy, remerciant Ses bons Subjects, accepte leur Benevolence, et ainsi le veult."

joe fulm   Link to this

According to Pepys on the 21st the Princess Royal Mary was 'dangerously ill'. On the 22nd he said the painters were finishing up. On this day, the 24th, the Princess Royal Mary dies and the painters are still in situ until 10 at night. Since Pepys has been out of the house the last two days have the painters been taking it easy as historical events came to pass?

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.