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William Bates (1625–1699) was an English Presbyterian minister.

William Bates, engraving by William Faithorne.

Life

He was born in London in November 1625, and was educated at Cambridge, initially at Emmanuel College and subsequently (1644) at Queens' College. In 1647 he proceeded B.A.[1] He was a presbyterian. His first living was St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London, and he remained as vicar until the Act of Uniformity 1662 was passed, when he was ejected. He also took part with other evangelical clergy in carrying on a lecture series in Cripplegate church under the name of 'Morning Exercise.'[2]

In the negotiations for the restoration of Charles II, Bates took part. Royal favour came to him, and he was appointed one of the royal chaplains. In 1660 he acted as one of the commissioners of the Savoy conference. In 1661 Cambridge conferred on him the degree of D.D. by royal mandate. At the same time he was urged to accept the deanery of Lichfield and Coventry, but like Richard Baxter, Edmund Calamy the elder, Thomas Manton, and others in their position, he declined office. Later, Bates conducted the discussion between the nonconformists and John Pearson, Peter Gunning, and Anthony Sparrow. In 1665 Bates took the oath imposed by the parliament which met at Oxford 'that he would not at any time endeavour an alteration in the government of church or state.' In this he was supported by John Howe and Matthew Poole, although Richard Baxter refused it.[2]

In 1668 some of the more moderate churchmen endeavoured to work out a scheme of comprehension that would bring presbyterians back into the Church of England. In this Bates, Baxter, and Manton co-operated. But no agreement could be reached. A little later he joined in the presentation of a petition to the king for 'relief of nonconformists'; the king received him graciously, but nothing came of it. Again in 1674, under the conduct of John Tillotson and Edward Stillingfleet, a fresh effort was made towards comprehension through Bates, but once more nothing came of it. After the accession of James II, the disabilities and sufferings of the nonconformists increased. Bates was at Baxter's side when George Jeffreys browbeat and insulted Baxter and his associates. He successfully interceded with Archbishop Tillotson in behalf of Nathaniel, Lord Crewe, bishop of Durham, who had been excepted from the act of indemnity of 1690.[2]

Bates delivered two speeches to William III and Mary on their accession on behalf of the dissenters. In the last years of his life he was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Hackney; he died there on 14 July 1699, aged seventy-four, having outlived and preached the funeral sermons of Baxter, Manton, Thomas Jacomb, and David Clarkson. As a preacher he was held to be 'silver-tongued' and the 'politest' of all the nonconformists. [2] John Howe's funeral sermon to Bates's memory was printed with Bates's works.

Works

William Bates, engraving by Robert White after Godfrey Kneller.

His works issued were first collected in 1700. They include:

  • Harmony of the Divine Attributes (1697?)[3]
    • Harmony of the Divine Attributes (1674)[4]
    • Harmony of the Divine Attributes (1675)[5]
    • Harmony of the Divine Attributes (1771)[6]
    • Harmony of the Divine Attributes (1831)[7]
    • The harmony of the divine attributes in the contrivance and accomplishment of mans redemption ([n.d.])[8]
  • Considerations on the Existence of God and Immortality of the Soul (1676).
  • Four Last Things–Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell (1691, reprinted 1838).[9]
  • Sermons preach'd on Several Occasions (1693).[10]
  • Spiritual Perfection (1699).
  • Vitae Selectorum aliquot Virorum qui doctrina, dignitate, aut pietate inclaruere (1681) Lives of famous divines in Latin.[11]
  • The whole works of the Rev. W. Bates (IV volumes) (printed in 1815)[12]
  • Joint author of The Attributes of God (1835)[13]
  • A funeral-sermon for the Reverend, holy and excellent divine, Mr. Richard Baxter, who deceased Decemb. 8, 1691 : with an account of his life (1692)[14]
  • An account of the life and death of Mr. Philip Henry, minister of the gospel near Whitchurch in Shropshire, who died 24 June 1696, in the sixty fifth year of his age ; with Dr. Bates's dedication (1797).[15]

Notes

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  1. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}"Bates, William (BTS643W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. ^ a b c d Grosart 1895.
  3. ^ Harmony of the Divine Attributes, c. 1697.
  4. ^ Harmony of the Divine Attributes, 1674.
  5. ^ Harmony of the Divine Attributes, 1675.
  6. ^ Harmony of the Divine Attributes, 1771.
  7. ^ Harmony of the Divine Attributes, 1831.
  8. ^ The harmony of the divine attributes in the contrivance and accomplishment of mans redemption, n.d., OL 14010971M
  9. ^ Four Last Things–Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell, 1838 [1691].
  10. ^ Sermons preach'd on Several Occasions, 1693.
  11. ^ Vitae Selectorum aliquot Virorum qui doctrina, dignitate, aut pietate inclaruere, 1681
  12. ^ The whole works of the Rev. W. Bates (IV volumes), 1815 Volume I, Volume II, Volume III Volume IV
  13. ^ Wilson, W.; Charnock, Stephen; Goodwin, Thomas; Bates, William; Wishart, William (1835), The Attributes of God: As They May be Contemplated by the Christian for Edification ... Selected ...
  14. ^ A funeral-sermon for the Reverend, holy and excellent divine, Mr. Richard Baxter, who deceased Decemb. 8, 1691 : with an account of his life, 1692, OL 24995799M
  15. ^ An account of the life and death of Mr. Philip Henry, minister of the gospel near Whitchurch in Shropshire, who died June 24, 1696, in the sixty fifth year of his age; with Dr. Bates's dedication, 1797, OL 22877105M

References

External links

1893 text

Dr. William Bates, one of the most eminent of the Puritan divines, and who took part in the Savoy Conference. His collected writings were published in 1700, and fill a large folio volume. The Dissenters called him silver-tongued Bates. Calamy affirmed that if Bates would have conformed to the Established Church he might have been raised to any bishopric in the kingdom. He died in 1699, aged seventy-four.


This text comes from a footnote on a diary entry in the 1893 edition edited by Henry B. Wheatley.

6 Annotations

Bill  •  Link

Bates' works are still in print, I have the 4 volume set. I have read some of them and they are very good.

vicente  •  Link

More: BRIEF MEMOIR OF THE REV. W. BATES, D. D. By Rev. W.Farmer:
Born nov 1625 Emanuel Coll: then King's Coll; 1644 BA 1660 DD
"Eleuchus motuum nuperrime". was produced by his father
talk of the Savoy conference
.' Dr. Gunning appeared to lean considerably towards a reconciliation of the church of England to Rome. He used, says Bishop Burnet, all the arts of sophistry in as confident a manner, as if they had been sound reasoning, and was very fond of Popish rituals and ceremonies.

http://www.newblehome.co.uk/bates/biog-memoir.html

Bill  •  Link

BATES (William), an eminent Nonconformist Divine was born in November 1625; admitted in Emanuel-college in Cambridge, and from thence removed to King's-college in 1644; took the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1647; and admitted Doctor of Divinity by the King's letters, dated November 9, 1660. Soon after the Restoration, he was appointed Chaplain to King Charles II, and became Minister of St Dunstan's in the West; but was deprived of that benefice for Nonconformity. He was one of the Commissioners at the Conference in the Savoy, in 1660, for reviewing the publick Liturgy, and was concerned in drawing up the Exceptions against the Common Prayer.
---Biographia Britannica. 1747.

Bill  •  Link

Dr. William Bates, minister of St. Dunstan's in the West, in the former part of this reign, was a man of a good and amiable character; much a scholar, much a gentleman, and no less a Christian. His moderation and sweetness of temper, were known to all that conversed with him; among whom were eminent and pious men of various persuasions. Dr. Tillotson's friendship for him began early; and as his merit was invariably the same, it continued without interruption, to the end of that prelate's life. His abilities qualified him for the highest dignities in the church: and it is certain that great offers were made him; but he could never be prevailed with to conform. All his works except his "Select Lives of illustrious and pious Persons," to which his own life would be a proper supplement, were published in one volume folio. He is esteemed the politest writer of his age, among the Presbyterians. Ob. 1699.
(Near 2000 persons, among whom was Dr. Bates, were silenced and deprived for nonconformity, after the Restoration.)
---A Biographical History of England. J. Granger, 1779.

Bill  •  Link

BATES, WILLIAM (1626-1699), presbyterian divine: B.A. King's College, Cambridge, 1647; held living of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London; ejected, 1662; royal chaplain and commissioner for Savoy conference, 1660; D.D. by royal mandate, 1661; made repeated unsuccessful efforts to obtain relief for nonconformists; published theologlcal writings.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

Bill  •  Link

Dr. William Bates, one of the most eminent of the Puritan divines, and who took part in the Savoy Conference. His collected writings were published in 1700, and fill a large folio volume. The Dissenters called him silver-tongued Bates. Calamy affirmed that if Bates would have conformed to the Established Church he might have been raised to any bishopric in the kingdom. He died in 1699, aged seventy-four.
---Wheatley, 1893.

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1661

1662

1667