8 Annotations

TerryF   Link to this

"René Descartes (March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, was a noted French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist." More from Wikipedia -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren%C3%A9_Descartes

Aqua   Link to this

Descartes dothe say when thee have enough cash income to provide a Tshirt, ham and eggs and cot, then thee have enough to sit back and enjoy thy brain,[and thy navel] and that be what he did.

Grahamt   Link to this

It was Descartes who said:
"Je pense, donc je suis", in his Discourse on Method (1637). Usually quoted in Latin as "Cogito, ergo sum", or "I think, therefore I am" in English.

dirk   Link to this

"I think, therefore I am"

The basic idea being that man can't trust his senses, who tell him that man exists and there is a world around him. It's conceivable that all this including man himself is just a figment of the imagination (whose?). The only way to solve this problem is doubt --about absolutely everything. "Methodical doubt". The one thing that eventually remains is just that "doubt", which is in essence a thought process. That thought process obviously exists, and cannot be subject to even the most methodical doubt itself. Therefore something must exist that thinks that thought. From thereon the philosopher can start to "rebuild the world aroun him ...

Pedro   Link to this

Descartes.

(Only read if you have a real interest in Physics and Philosophy!)

For a journey through Physics and philosophy since Descartes see Physics and Philosophy…Werner Heisenberg (1958)

http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/philo...

JWB   Link to this

"René Descartes (1596-1650) and the Meditations on First Philosophy",
Kelley L. Ross, Ph.D.:

"Descartes is justly regarded as the Father of Modern Philosophy. This is not because of the positive results of his investigations, which were few, but because of the questions that he raised and problems that he created, problems that have still not been answered to everyone's satisfaction: particularly the Problem of Knowledge and the Mind-Body Problem. And in a day when philosophy and science were not distinguished from each other, Descartes was a famous physicist and mathematician as well as a philosopher. Descartes' physics was completely overthrown by that of Newton, so we do not much remember him for that. But Descartes was a great mathematician of enduring importance."

I suggest you do yourself a favor & read complete bio & then look around this site.
http://www.friesian.com/hist-2.htm#descartes

Aqua   Link to this

Available in pocket book form 6 1/4" x 4 " for reading in a crowded underground/subway; Collectors Library; Barnes and Noble $4.95
Jesuit educated, settled in Holland . but decided to go tutoring the Queen Kristina of Sweden, but yhr yr weather proved harsh, died of Pneumonia early in '50. Private income allowed him to try differing occupations like Soldier, tourist, and play with cartesian coordinates xyz, also used his time to THINK, the motto of IBM.

Aqua   Link to this

No !Descartes.

(Only read if you have a real interest in Physics and Philosophy!)
4 rules for systematic thinking

The first was never to accept anything for true which I did not clearly know to be such; that is to say, carefully to avoid precipitancy and prejudice, and to comprise nothing more in my judgement than what was presented to my mind so clearly and distinctly as to exclude all ground of doubt.
The second, to divide each of the difficulties under examination into as many parts as possible, and as might be necessary for its adequate solution.
The third, to conduct my thoughts in such order that, by commencing with objects the simplest and easiest to know, I might ascend by little and little, and, as it were, step by step, to the knowledge of the more complex; assigning in thought a certain order even to those objects which in their own nature do not stand in a relation of antecedence and sequence.
And the last, in every case to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so general, that I might be assured that nothing was omitted.
http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/d/descarte...

Along with all action always gets a reaction, and an idea in motion, stays in motion until it be proved totaly false.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.

References

  • 1663
  • 1668