5 Annotations

Paul Miller   Link to this

[Translators to readers of the 1611 King James Bible.]
Truly wee neuer thought from the beginning, that we should neede to make a new Translation, nor yet to make of a bad one a good one,... but to make a good one better, or out of many good ones, one principall good one, not
iustly to be excepted against; that hath bene our indeauour, that our marke.

Brief history of the King James Bible
http://www.av1611.org/kjv/kjvhist.html

James I (1603-25 AD)
http://www.britannia.com/history/monarchs/mon46...

"In the Beginning" is an excellent book by Alister McGrath that tells the story of the King James bible and how it changed a nation, a language, and a culture.

Jenny Doughty   Link to this

This link takes you to the page on the Gutenberg website where you can download the King James version of the Bible.

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook...

vincent   Link to this

More on Bible: Many of the colonists [mass] used the Geneva version, and there is a good chance that it was in circulation in London too, most Royalist would not touch it because of the idea of separating the king and state judicary. "Tis why James I insisted that it be redone to get rid of the thought that Royalty was not the Ideal situation.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/geneva/Geneva...
http://www.reformedreader.org/gbn/en.htm

Terry F   Link to this

Power and Glory: Jacobean England and the Making of the King James Bible
by Adam Nicolson
HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2003

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Power-Glory-Jacobean-En...

AKA

God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible
Adam Nicolson
HarperCollins, 2003

http://www.amazon.com/Gods-Secretaries-Making-J...

King James I assembled scholars and clergyman to create a new translation of the bible to settle conflicting church dogma between Catholics and Prosestants and unite England as a nation. [Between 1603 and 1611 the three panels of experts translated but 49% of the text anew, incorporating Cranmer's Psalter, etc.]

Australian Susan   Link to this

Cranmer's Psalter
Cramner, when faced with creating a vernacular Prayer Book (pub 1549) had no legally sanctioned translation of the Bible to use for Psalms. He used the version from Coverdale's Bible, which was in undercover circulation in England. He didn't translate them himself.

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References

  • 1660
    • Nov
  • 1663
  • 1666
    • Oct
  • 1667