Friday 10 November 1665

Up, and entered all my Journall since the 28th of October, having every day’s passages well in my head, though it troubles me to remember it, and which I was forced to, being kept from my lodging, where my books and papers are, for several days. So to my office, where till two or three o’clock busy before I could go to my lodging to dinner, then did it and to my office again. In the evening newes is brought me my wife is come: so I to her, and with her spent the evening, but with no great pleasure, I being vexed about her putting away of Mary in my absence, but yet I took no notice of it at all, but fell into other discourse, and she told me, having herself been this day at my house at London, which was boldly done, to see Mary have her things, that Mr. Harrington, our neighbour, an East country merchant, is dead at Epsum of the plague, and that another neighbour of ours, Mr. Hollworthy, a very able man, is also dead by a fall in the country from his horse, his foot hanging in the stirrup, and his brains beat out. Here we sat talking, and after supper to bed.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Abrupt change of emotions: the day's entry ends in bathos.:

"another neighbour of ours, Mr. Hollworthy, a very able man, is also dead by a fall in the country from his horse, his foot hanging in the stirrup, and his brains beat out. Here we sat talking, and after supper to bed."

cgs   Link to this

The secret is out, now we know how he keeps is journal going.

Ralph Berry   Link to this

"..and entered all my Journall since the 28 of October.."

The secret may be out as to how he keeps it going but what a fantastic memory to be able to recall all the detail he has described in the last 12 days. He was an amazing man!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

He kept notes of the most important details.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... is also dead by a fall in the country from his horse, his foot hanging in the stirrup, and his brains beat out."

A fate I have too frequently wished upon the numerous 'Hunt Breakfast' solipsists too absorbed in themselves to say anything of interest about the scenting, the hounds or the chase "who come in with a great deale of company from hunting ... a great many silly stories they tell of their sport, which pleases them mightily, ..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/11/09/

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... Mr. Harrington, our neighbour, an East country merchant, is dead at Epsum of the plague, ..."

L&M footnote that he died in 1669.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...having herself been this day at my house at London, which was boldly done, to see Mary have her things..."

The bold adventuress, Bess Pepys. Though I suspect Sam meant he was a tad annoyed at her going without milord husband's approval.

Still, I have always thought that Sam in his heart of hearts rather liked Bess' spirit. I hope so.

Considering she could have looted your chests in the cellar and be headed for Paris right now with Browne, Will Hewer, Will Penn, Jr., Pendleton, Uncle Wight, or Capt Ferrers...Or the whole crew, Sam...I'd show a little gratitude.

Though to be fair, any good husband would be legitimately concerned about such a trip. Another little window into the life of Bess St. Michel Pepys suggesting she was hardly held captive at home, however deficient Sam may have been in other respects.

"And sir...You might add that I never agreed to the thing with my uncle Wight." Sam, proud air of the model...well for 1665...husband.

"Darling...Don't push it." Bess frowns.

***
Say, Bess...Do us one favor and cough a couple of times when you and Sam hit the sack.

jeannine   Link to this

and entered all my Journall since the 28 of October..”

In addition to remembering what he did all of those days (even with notes) he also had to write it by hand. I did a copy and paste into a word document to see how many words and/or characters he wrote (approximate--I deleted the editor notes etc.) and it's about 5433 words or 22595 characters, without including spaces. It was about 6 pages of type. I can't imagine how tedious it would be to write all of that out long hand in one day, with candlelight and a slower writing instrument than what we have today. Even with great lighting and a 'good' pen it would not be a chore for wimps (like me!)

dirk   Link to this

From the Carte Papers, Bodleian Library
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Minutes of a Council of War, held on board the Royal James, at the Nore, 10 November, 1665

Date: 10 November 1665

Direct the dispostion of ships specified into Winter-quarters, and the mustering of crews. ...

cgs   Link to this

Writing : please do not forget the making of the ink and then the constant dipping and the removing the dripping excess and the many quills [all those Thames swans that be having feathers removed] he dothe use.
Along with sopping up of dropped spots and then be those odd bits that get on the fingers. [oh! the good old days before Biro's]

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

- to wrote all of that in long hand -
Did not Sam write in shorthand? Must have been faster.

cgs   Link to this

Did not Sam write in shorthand?

Ans: Yes he dothe write in Sheldon lingo for his notes for his private inspiration and consumption, and maybe he did some for his preparation of notes [Questionable] to give work to the clerical staff but for his daily work, it be in longhand, blots and all.

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