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Antiquarian has posted 6 annotations/comments since 19 March 2013.

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About Castle

Antiquarian   Link to this

At the time of Pepys' visits to the Castle tavern in 1667 I belive the landlord was Thomas Springall (or Springell). For more details of this landlord and tavern see the following link;

http://pepyssmallchange.wordpress.com/2014/02/0...

About King's Head (Chancery Lane)

Antiquarian   Link to this

This tavern is one of the many mentioned in Pepys' diary that are known to have issued contemporary trade tokens. Three separate sets of tokens (two farthings and a half penny) were issued in the name of the King’s Head tavern at Chancery Lane End by three successive landlords between the approximate national token issuing period c.1648 and 1672.
Each of these sets of tokens carries a triad of initials of their respective issuers. While none of the tokens are dated it is possible to arrange them in a chronological issuing sequence as their respective issuers have been identified and their tenancies approximately date as follows;

T.K. & A.K. – Thomas Kent and his wife (Anne?) who ran the tavern from 1630 to 1660

L.W. & H.M. – The partnership of Lewis Wilson and Henry Morris who ran the tavern between 1660 to c.1662. After which Henry Morris appears to have left the partnership.

W.M. & K.M. – William Mart and his wife (Katherine?) who ran the tavern between 1666 to 1682. Prior to this the couple had run the Queen’s Head in Fleet Street where they also issued trade tokens.

For an illustration of one of the tokens issued by Thomas Kent and his wife see the article on the at the following web link - http://pepyssmallchange.wordpress.com/2013/06/2... .

About Fleece (Covent Garden)

Antiquarian   Link to this

William Clifton, the landlord of the Fleece dyring the period of Pepys' visits was one of those many tradesmen who issued there own tokens during the period 1648/9 to 1672. Clifton issued both farthings and half pennies in the name of the Fleece. For an image and more information about these tokens see the post at;

http://pepyssmallchange.wordpress.com/2013/06/1...

About Hercules Pillars (Fleet St)

Antiquarian   Link to this

This tavern is one of the many mentioned in Pepys' diary that are known to have issued contemporary trade tokens.

In the case of The Hercules Pillars two separate tokens are recorded. Firstly a brass farthing, possibly issued by the landlord John Symonds and his wife in the mid-1650s. The second token, a copper half penny, was issued in the name of a later landlord, Edward Oldham and his wife. This second token appears to date on stylistic grounds to the mid-1660s. Edward Oldham appears to have been the landlord of The Hercules Pillars from c.1657 to at least 1666. In the Hearth Tax return for the latter mentioned year Edward Oldham is recorded as occupying a property with 17 hearths close to St Dunstand's Church (which was on the opposite side of Fleet Street to The Hercules Pillars). Such a number of hearths appears to be a typical number for a larger sized London tavern of this period.

There is an image and description of the first of the above mentioned tokens on the following site; http://pepyssmallchange.wordpress.com.

About Friday 6 September 1661

Antiquarian   Link to this

The Ship Tavern here has been identified as that in Ship Yard which was located south of Little Sheer Lane and north up an alley leading off The Strand (at the head of Butcher Row) in the Temple Bar district.
How can we be certain that it isn’t a reference to one of the other Ship taverns in London that have been associated with entries in Pepys’ diary? Surely this could just as equally be a reference to one of the following;
1) The Ship in Bartholomew Lane
2) The Ship in Threadneedle Street (behind the Royal Exchange)
3) The Ship in Bishopsgate Street (also referred to as The Great James)

About Trumpet (King St)

Antiquarian   Link to this

This tavern is one of the many mentioned in Pepys' diary that are known to have issued contemporary trade tokens. The one issued by the Trumpet is a brass farthing and probably dates to the 1650s. There is an image and description of it on the following site; http://pepyssmallchange.wordpress.com .