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Terry Foreman has posted 16,358 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Friday 11 July 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Notice the many ways Sam uses the experiential = experimental method to establish various truths to his satisfaction in this one entry: he "viewed" (5, including Mr. Coventry's chamber), “saw”(2), “found” (5, including Mr. Coventry's chamber) — “knows that his business is the reality more than the reflection” as Xjy said:

“down to Deptford…and there viewed some deals…we found them good. Then to Woolwich, and viewed well all the houses and stores there,….and then to Mr. Ackworth's and Sheldon's to view their books, which we found not to answer the King's service and security at all as to the stores. Then to the Ropeyard, and there viewed the hemp, wherein we found great corruption, and then saw a trial between Sir R. Ford's yarn and our own, and found great odds….; and at Mr. Coventry's chamber, which is very neat and fine….”

About Thursday 10 July 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" before I went to the office I practised my arithmetique"

I wonder how he did that? Recite the multiplication tables, then check the answers? I can't recall how I learned them when I was 10, over a half-century ago.

About Thursday 10 July 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"despatching...businesses...till night, and so home and by daylight to bed."

This recurrent turn of speech says to me that the suggestion that "night" = too dark to read, and "daylight" = something like dusk, with enough light to forego a link, is correct.

About Friday 4 July 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

If Latin was expected of entrants to colleges in colonial times, Australian Susan, it sure isn't now.
I was fortunate enough to have had 4 years in high school in the late 1950's, in a Southern California HS where 96% of my class went on to some higher ed -- I to Stanford and more Latin; my ex- in Connectcut in a Yale-influenced HS; but it is now more rare (Latin in her HS is gone, in mime it persists; those enrolled are 1st generation Chinese-Americans).

About Friday 4 July 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Was Latin ever required for admission to the American equivalents of Oxford?

"In 1750, Harvard demanded that applicants be able to extemporaneously "read, construe, and parse Cicero, Virgil, or such like classical authors and to write Latin in prose, and to be skilled in making Latin verse, or at least to know the rules of Prosodia, and to read, construe, and parse ordinary Greek as in the New testament, Isocrates, or such like and decline the paradigms of Greek nouns and verbs." Of note is the fact that John Trumball, the illustrious artist, passed Harvard's exacting entrance exam at only 12 years of age.

"Alexander Hamilton's alma mater, King's College (now Columbia), had similarly stringent prerequisites for prospective students. Applicants were required to "give a rational account of the Greek and Latin grammars, read three orations of Cicero and three books of Virgil's Aeneid, and translate the first 10 chapters of John from Greek into Latin."

"James Madison had it no easier when he applied for entrance to the College of New Jersey (now Princeton) in 1769. Madison and his fellow applicants were obliged to demonstrate "the ability to write Latin prose, translate Virgil, Cicero, and the Greek gospels and a commensurate knowledge of Latin and Greek grammar."

http://www.grecoreport.com/the_founding_fathers_&…

About Biographies of related people

Terry Foreman  •  Link

King Charles I by Pauline Gregg - ebook readable & searchable online

A very nice history that places Charles' kingship in European and domestic contexts, with the table of contents alway visible on the left as you read.

University of California Press, Berkeley -- Los Angeles -- Oxford, 1984 http://content.cdlib.org:8088/xtf/view?docId=ft9v…

Hardcover
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/052…
Paperback
Pub. Phoenix Press; New Ed edition (April 1, 2001)
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/184…

Paperback
Pub, Weidenfeld & Nicholson history, 2000
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/18421219…

About Contemporary diaries

Terry Foreman  •  Link

A most complete list of diaries of the 1600's is the Diary Research Website

..."a guide to historical and literary sources, in the forms of Diaries and Journals, from all periods and parts of the world, which have been printed in English; its principal content is a searchable version of part of the second edition of An Annotated Bibliography of Diaries Printed in English, compiled by Christopher Handley and published in hardback and electronic formats by Hanover Press." - Christopher Sampson Handley, 2002 and 2005 http://www.diarysearch.co.uk/index.html

“The form of the Bibliography follows the pattern set by William Matthews…: diarists are listed alphabetically under the year in which the first diary entry occurs….” http://www.diarysearch.co.uk/new_page_2.htm A clue to the richness of the site is that the year 1660 yields, besides Wheatley and L&M, 8 further Pepys sources (if my count be right) and the works of 6 other diarists. http://diarysearch.co.uk/Subweb/1660ad.htm The 1600’s offer 60 web-pages of diaries, averaging 7/=420, many restricted to a locale or a voyage, etc., most British, some colonial, some translations (the oldest diary tradition is the Japanese, pioneered by noblewomen): http://diarysearch.co.uk/Subweb/new_page_1.htm

Here is the entry for Barlow, noted by Pedro: BARLOW, Edward (b.1642) of Prestwich, Lancashire B27 1659 to 1703 Matthews: Sea diary; in King’s ships, East and West Indiamen, and other merchantmen; life at sea and ashore; the lure of the sea; excellent diary of voyages and observations of a common seaman and details of the sailor’s life; modernised, but very interesting language and conversation. 1. Barlow’s Journal of his Life at Sea in King’s Ships, East & West Indiamen & Other Merchantmen from 1659-1703 edited by Basil Lubbock. London, Hurst and Blackett, two volumes, 1934. 2. Extracts: Houlbrooke, p 34. http://diarysearch.co.uk/Subweb/1658ad.htm

About Non-fiction about Pepys' time

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Birth, Marriage, and Death: Ritual, Religion, and the Life-Cycle in Tudor and Stuart England by David Cressy (Oxford, 1999)

In Chapters on Birth (4), Baptism (4), Churchings (1), Courtship (2), Marriage (5) and Death (4), 44 pages draw on evidence from the Pepys Diary.

Amazon.co.uk - Hardcover and paperback
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle…

Amazon.com - hardcover
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/019…

Amazon.com - paperback
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/019…

About Non-fiction about Pepys' time

Terry Foreman  •  Link

To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World by Arthur Herman (HarperCollins, Oct. 2004), available for searching online as a Google Print book, in a series of lively incidents traces the story in 21 chapters from the 16c competition with Spain over transatlantic slavery to the 20c "Long Journey Home."

But the navy becomes itself in Chap. Nine, as "Mr. Pepys' Navy."

http://print.google.com/print?id=EgH1u2sJt4oC&lpg…

Hardcover http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060534249/

Hardcover and paperback (Perennial, Nov. 1, 2005)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle…


About Contemporary diaries

Terry Foreman  •  Link

A Critical Edition of John Beadle's A Journall or Diary of a Thankfull Christian [1656]
(Renaissance Imagination)
by John Beadle, Germaine Fry Murray (Editor)

"Synopsis: Beadle's book is essentially a how-to manual about how to write a spiritual diary; moreover, it is the only one of its kind written in seventeenth-century England. Modern scholars often mention its influence and importance in understanding the "journaling" impulse among the Puritans of the 16th and 17th centuries. This is the first modern systematic examination or critical edition of the work. ..."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0815315678/
Garland Publishing (March 1, 1996)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/08153156…
Garland Science, December 1996

About Leads

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Pauline, "patio" is a Spanish word from "patio de recreo" = "playground." The OED sez "patio" was used by Kipling in 1891, but then entered general use in English in the 1940's and 1950's: it was part of the vernacular then in Southern California where I was reared. So the "Pizza Patio" is, ah, bi-lingual (tho I hope one will suffice for its fare).

About Sunday 13 April 1662

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The origins of the 24-hour day and the units into which we divide time and space:

"The ancient Egyptians made several contributions to horology, the science of measuring time. Around 1500 B.C., they developed a sundial, onto which they divided the daylight hours into 10 equal parts. They also defined two hours as "twilight hours," one in the morning and one in the evening. Historians believe that the Egyptians used an early astronomical tool called a merkhet at night to mark the passage of "clock stars," specific stars that were equally spread across the sky. During the summer night, 12 clock stars passed the merkhet.

"With a 10 hour day, 2 twilight hours and 12 hours of night, the Egyptians arrived at a 24-hour day. Since an hour was always 1/12 of the period of light or darkness, it was not a fixed quantity. In the summer, for example, a daylight hour was longer than a nighttime hour.

"The next major step forward came from the Babylonians, between approximately 300 and 100 BC They used the sexagesimal--or base-60--system for their astronomical calculations. Although no one knows why they chose 60, one reason may be because base-60 makes divisional operations easy since 60 is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, etc. Just as base-10 can be divided into decimal places, base-60 can be divided into fractional places. The first fractional place is called a minute, the second place is called a second. These fractional place names were applied to hours, as well as to degrees for measuring angles.”

http://www.riverdeep.net/current/2000/11/113000_c…

About Bladder and kidney stones

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Like Samuel Pepys, 15, James K. Polk, 17, who would be the 11th US President, was operated for a bladder stone and rendered sterile, dying childless.

January 18, 2004
James K. Polk
by John Seigenthaler
http://www.booknotes.org/Transcript/?ProgramID=17…
[...]
And...documents...left by...McDowell, the Danville, Kentucky, specialist, one of the great surgeons in the history of this country [ were ] relied on to demonstrate that this was really a urinary stone operation. And it was...a brutal operation. Here's a 17-year-old young man, constantly, almost chronically ill with lower-abdomen pains..., and they rush him to Danville, where...Ephraim McDowell, operates.

Now, the operation...was brutal. No antiseptic. And they only could give him brandy. They didn't have any antisepsis to stop the poison. They held him down. His uncle was with him. They put him up on his shoulders. They used what was called a gorget. And if you look at the gorget, I mean, it looks like it sounds, a vicious knife. And they went between the scrotum and the anus, right through the prostate. How he ever survived is remarkable. But he did.
[...]
There's no doubt in my mind...that he and Sarah were childless as a result of this operation...
I created a panel of about nine doctors, ...some specialists, some general practitioners. All... concluded after they looked at it that [ there was ] not much doubt that he was either left sterile or impotent or both. And so it was a childless marriage.
[...]