Annotations and comments

Harry R has posted 31 annotations/comments since 6 July 2020.

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About Saturday 22 February 1667/68

Harry R  •  Link

"and there did buy Kircher’s Musurgia, cost me 35s.,"

During the month Sam has been organising his books to his great satisfaction, being "fain to lay by several books to make room for better" (2nd Feb) and now he's bought this door stopper. Reading on in the diary the last mention of the book is on 4th March, when he brings home the bound copy. It's beautifully illustrated but appears to be in Latin, and is 745 pages long. Perhaps he never read it.

I picked up this link from a 13/03/2011 annotation by Michael Robinson

http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuViewfull?…
.

About Monday 3 February 1667/68

Harry R  •  Link

Sarah & Nicholas - this too, from 06/01/67:

"and so away to bed, weary and mightily pleased, and have the happiness to reflect upon it as I do sometimes on other things, as going to a play or the like, to be the greatest real comfort that I am to expect in the world, and that it is that that we do really labour in the hopes of; and so I do really enjoy myself, and understand that if I do not do it now I shall not hereafter, it may be, be able to pay for it, or have health to take pleasure in it, and so fill myself with vain expectation of pleasure and go without it."

About Tuesday 21 January 1667/68

Harry R  •  Link

Joyce is an indirect and unrecorded victim of the fire, as are so many Covid victims today. In the 9th Jan entry Sam wanted more time to consider the 350l loan that Joyce had sought but he doesn't reflect on how that delay may have impinged on his state of mind.

About Thursday 9 January 1667/68

Harry R  •  Link

Referring to some old and well aired annotations:

"John Evelyn's Diary - 9th January, 1668. Went to see the revels at the Middle Temple, which is also an old riotous custom, and has relation neither to virtue nor policy."

The Middle Temple Revels continue to this day, what would Evelyn make of that? https://www.middletemple.org.uk/civicrm/event/inf…

And regarding the availability of news and general awareness of who was the current Pope etc it surprised me in yesterday's diary that Sam didn't spell Prynne's name correctly.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

Harry R  •  Link

There have been some wonderful diary entries of late. In Sam's descriptions of the High Mass in the Park on Dec 24 and of the gamblers at Groome-Porters on Jan 1 he closely observes the behaviour of others. In today's diary entry Sam is so wrapped up in his own enjoyment of his party that he doesn't give us that detail. Instead his "hav(ing) the happiness to reflect upon" and other thoughts at the end of his day are an observation of himself.

About Monday 23 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

I also add my thanks, to annotators past and present for their insights and observations and to Phil and Sam especially for making it possible. The Diary has become an enjoyable and indispensable daily routine for me and I wish I'd come across it sooner. Merry Christmas to all.

About Saturday 21 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

"This makes me think Pepys was basically more of a Puritan than he lets on,"

My impression of Sam, admittedly only formed over a year of Diary reading, is that he isn't religious and therefore doesn't lean one way or the other. He is careful not to discuss his views because of the times he lives in, his job and his attachment to the Duke of York. In tomorrow's diary he is amused and content to just listen to Hollier's strong and excitable opinions. He attends church most weeks but not all and only tends to comment on the sermons or the fine ladies in the congregation, and he might indulge in some predatory behaviour. His interest in science and astronomy illustrates an open mind.

About Saturday 21 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

Fascinating background, Sarah. I'd not heard of Symon Patrick before, and from a quick search of the The Diary neither has Sam. I wonder if Patrick got the recognition for his contribution to the preservation of the C of E at the time. Perhaps he wasn't looking for it, more a lifter than a leaner.

About Sunday 15 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

"looking over my plate, which indeed is a very fine quantity"

Surely no coincidence that Sam received some plate a few days ago from Lady Montagu / Sandwich. He was unsure at the time that this was intended to secure the £200 loan to her husband. Does he regard the plate as his now for keeps?

About Saturday 7 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

(which was pretty odde)

This had me chuckling to myself for a few minutes. A "More tea, vicar?" moment. Contemplating what thoughts came into Sam's and Betty's heads adds to my amusement, especially after Sam's first impressions of the handsome and esoteric Mrs Hunt.

About Thursday 5 December 1667

Harry R  •  Link

And thanks from me too, Sarah, for all of your detailed input generally. It really adds to my understanding of the life and times.

About Monday 18 November 1667

Harry R  •  Link

- "but it was in his manner to the King’s wrong."

Is Pepys saying here that the late Lord Treasurer was too quick to settle valid debts / claims to the disadvantage of the Crown? I don't understand why he would take that view.

About Friday 15 November 1667

Harry R  •  Link

Some interesting diary entries after brief offerings of late. Putting aside the important business of the day and his genning up on what constitutes treason, Sam, by prior arrangement, is jamming with two renowned composers. He is disdainful of the mean musique they make and of the Frenchman's virtuosity on the theorbo. I wonder what they made of his efforts. And it's only two days since he renewed his vows and he has the girl combing his head before bed. What is he thinking of? Where is Elizabeth?

About Wednesday 13 November 1667

Harry R  •  Link

"Thence home, and there to my chamber, and do begin anew to bind myself to keep my old vows, and among the rest not to see a play till Christmas but once in every other week, and have laid aside 10l., which is to be lost to the poor, if I do. This I hope in God will bind me, for I do find myself mightily wronged in my reputation, and indeed in my purse and business, by my late following of my pleasure for so long time as I have done."

I wonder what's eating Sam. Apart from his play going, and where's the sin in that, the Protectorate being long gone, he seems to have walked the line. What aspects of his reputation have been wronged, and by whom, that he needs to renew his vows? And why have they affected his purse? Has Sam been leaving matters of a personal nature out of his diary? Anyway the prospect of losing £10 to the poor should steel his resolve.

About Friday 8 November 1667

Harry R  •  Link

More daylight in the office might ease Sam's eyesight problems though he doesn't mention this is a benefit.

About Tuesday 29 October 1667

Harry R  •  Link

I had read that but that doesn't seem like much of a defence. Why couldn't procedures have been put in place to pay the men at the docks. How had men been paid before somebody came up with the bright idea of tickets?

About Tuesday 29 October 1667

Harry R  •  Link

"about the business of discharging men by ticket,"

I, like Fern 10 years ago (to the day! My, how time flies!) am confused by this issue. Had money been available to pay the men and if so who had had it? Should it have been ring fenced by the Navy Board? Had they misappropriated it, greased wheels with it, or was there simply not enough money to cover all their legitimate costs? Coventry and Bruncker are at pains to avoid telling the whole truth for fear of implicating themselves, but in what?