Annotations and comments

has posted 36 annotations/comments since 30 March 2020.

Comments

About Thursday 10 October 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

Do you suppose Pepys spent any time rereading his old diary entries? Does he ever mention in the diary that he’s done that? Of course he lived another thirty-three years after ending the diary so for that period we can’t know.

About Thursday 10 October 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

An amusing entry. I wonder if any of the missing gold remains, to be discovered by metal detectorists. No doubt that ground has been gone over many times by now.

About Tuesday 17 September 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

Elizabeth as we know was soon to die. Samuel actually loved her, as the diary shows. He lived another thirty-some years afterward. He might’ve bitterly regretted his past behavior in these latter years.

About Monday 16 September 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“Here I also saw a printed account of the examinations taken, touching the burning of the City of London, shewing the plot of the Papists therein...”

I’ve found online

“A BALLAD UPON THE POPISH PLOT
Written by a Lady of Quality.“

The Popish Plot came after the conclusion of the diary, but Samuel was implicated, and was even confined to the Tower for some period of time. I enjoyed reading this ballad and thought others might too. I couldn’t find any performance of the ballad, maybe I didn’t try hard enough, but it’s to the tune of “Packington’s Pound” which I did find a performance of on Apple Music. It’s a pretty tune. Here are the lyrics: http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/ballad/32878/xml

There’s even a comic strip (!) drawn by Francis Barlow about the plot. “The Horrid Hellish Popish Plot” (1682).

https://web.archive.org/web/20191225121355/https:…

About Monday 16 September 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“‘sluttish dinner’
Meanings change over time, Nicolas.“

Aha, thank you, John.
I had assumed the dinner was sluttish because Sam thought the hostess a slut for having painted her face. Anyway it was the funniest thing I’ve read in the diary for awhile.

About Monday 16 September 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“Here I also saw a printed account of the examinations taken, touching the burning of the City of London, shewing the plot of the Papists therein...”

Invented conspiracy theories seem to be a human weakness or affliction of human nature.

About Monday 16 September 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“Being tired of being here, and sick of their damned sluttish dinner, my wife and Mercer and I away to the King’s play-house...”

I laughed out loud when I read this. How can a dinner be sluttish?

About Thursday 4 July 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“So, according to Pepys (about half way through this entry), he realizes he had the story wrong, and it was Bazil who died at Christopher Fielding's hand.”

So the encyclopedia entries are wrong as they have it backwards. Can someone correct them?

About Thursday 4 July 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

Terry Foreman states on 5 July 2010 on this page
“L&M note -- Christopher Fielding was sentenced to death for the murder (by stabbing) of his brother Basil.”

But the link to “Bazill Fielding” 4 July 2010 states
“Basil Fielding
Page to Lady Sandwich; stabbed to death his drunken brother Christopher May 9 1667.“
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/11095/

And the link to Christopher Fielding dated 26 May 2012
states
“Christopher Fielding
Was drunk in a brawl with his brother Basil, Page to Lady Sandwich, and was stabbed to death by him May 9 1667.“
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/11096/

There is a conflict here. Who stabbed whom?

About Wednesday 19 June 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“Did anyone else laugh out loud at the telling of the burying of the gold?”

Yes, I did. And it made me wonder briefly if the gold might still be there! Of course I know it couldn’t be true.

About Friday 25 October 1661

Nicolas  •  Link

“ Such a pity the Hudson review is no longer available”

It’s still online but the archives don’t go back as far as the Summer 2004 issue in which the article appeared. The website states you may contact them to inquire if the back issue is still available for purchase.

The Hudson Review
33 West 67th Street
New York, NY 10023
212.650.0020

About Tuesday 30 April 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

Actually I couldn’t find any mention of what the case was made of. Terry’s comment (above) of 08 Apr 2016 said it was of leather. Claire Tomalin’s biography doesn’t indicate it either.
She says in a footnote that Evelyn’s diary entry of 10 Jun 1669 mentions the case. I haven’t looked that up. The case was ordered on 20 Aug 1664. The diary is silent on that point as far as I can tell. https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/08/20/

About Tuesday 30 April 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

I think I’ve found the answer to my question. His residence (and office) on Seething Lane was destroyed by fire on 29 January 1673. No one was hurt. But the stone might’ve perished in the fire.

About Tuesday 30 April 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

What has become of Sam’s stone in its leather case? I suppose if it was among his effects at death it hasn’t survived the passing centuries.

About Friday 29 March 1667

Nicolas  •  Link

“...and so to the Bull-Head Taverne, whither he brought my French gun; and one Truelocke, the famous gunsmith, that is a mighty ingenious man, and he did take my gun in pieces, and made me understand the secrets thereof and upon the whole I do find it a very good piece of work, and truly wrought; but for certain not a thing to be used much with safety: and he do find that this very gun was never yet shot off: I was mighty satisfied with it and him, and the sight of so much curiosity of this kind.“

Truelocke, how appropriate a surname for a famous gunsmith! Flintlock guns were in use throughout Europe in Pepys’ time.

One wonders where he acquired his French gun, and why he owns it, never having fired it. Maybe it’s a recent acquisition.