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Pedro   Link to this

Robert Sansum

Robert Sansum's flagship at the Battle of Lowestoft was the 3rd Rate, Resolution (58 guns). Robert Sansum was killed at this battle. He had been a Rear-Admiral of the White in Prince Rupert's squadron.

During the Commonwealth, Robert Sansum commanded a number of ships:

From 1651 to 1653, he commanded the small
frigate, the Bryer.

From 1654 to 1655, he commanded the 4th Rate Adventure.

From 1655 to 1660 (the Restoration), he commanded the larger 4th Rate, the Portsmouth.

This information is from R.C. Anderson's List of English Naval Captains 1642-1660, published by the Society for Nautical Research in 1964. I have found this to be a very valuable source.

Robert Sansum's flagship at the Battle of Lowestoft was the 3rd Rate, Resolution (58 guns). Robert Sansum was killed at this battle. He had been a Rear-Admiral of the White in Prince Rupert's squadron.

http://www.kentishknock.com/officers4.shtml

Bill   Link to this

SANSOME, or SAMPSON, Robert,—was appointed to the Mary Rose, and Dunkirk, successively, in the year 1664. He hoisted his flag, on board the latter ship, as rear-admiral of the fleet sent out under the command of prince Rupert, when the rupture with the Dutch was first expected. In the following year he was made rear-admiral of the white; and having hoisted his flag on board the Resolution, was one of the gallant and unfortunate commanders, who, in all ages, have held their own personal safety as of no value when put in competition with the happiness, and glory of their native country. He was killed in the engagement between the duke of York and Opdam. The case of admiral Sansome, as an officer, most justly entitled to posthumous fame, is singularly unfortunate. He is commemorated by historians, only in the fatal moment which put a period to his existence, and extolled in such general terms as are, as his just due, bestowed on every man who fairly offers his life a tribute to his country's welfare. We remain totally ignorant of those more minute, though scarcely less interesting particulars of his life, which historians, nearly his cotemporaries, might have furnished with less trouble to themselves, and more truth to posterity, than the most accurate and laborious investigation of the present day can attain, or hope for.
---Biographia Navalis. J. Charnock, 1794.

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References

  • 1665