Summary

Stoveing, in sail-making, is the heating of the bolt-ropes, so as to make them pliable. — B.

3 Annotations

JWB   Link to this

"STOVING is placing of white rope in an iron stove or oven, to which heat is communicated by means of a flute, which makes the rope more limber and pliant to receive the tar, " Steel: "The Elements and Practice of Rigging and Seasmanship", London 1794
http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Etymology/Eng...

CGS   Link to this

stove , an interesting word;
A steam; a mist rising from the ground.
another entry for the OED:

1. a. A hot air bath; a sweating-room; = STEW n.2 3, STUFE. Obs.
In the second quot. the pl. is used with sing. construction.

2. A sitting-room or bedroom heated with a furnace. Chiefly with reference to Germany, the Low Countries, Scandinavia, or Russia. (Cf. STEW n.2 2.) Obs.
?
4. A heated chamber or box for some special purpose.

a. The action of STOVE v.1 in various senses.
1456 SIR G. HAY Gov. Princes Wks. (S.T.S.) II. 143 Efter the stoving and bathing, men suld sytt on faire bynkis on thai herberis.

1664-5 PEPYS Diary 13 Feb.

dirk   Link to this

The word "stove" is also etymologically related to the other English word "stew", to the German "Stube" (small, cosy winehouse), and was at some point in time (16th & 17th c) also a slang word for brothel in various languages (English, Dutch, German?) - it's all to do with various ways of heating ;-)

Cf. http://www.etymonline.com/

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References

  • 1665