Summary

The Ferraboscos were an Italian family of musicians. A note in L&M suggests the Ferrabosco Pepys refers to may have been Elizabeth, although it’s hard to be sure.

2 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

Other family members who were English court musicians:-

Alfonso Ferrabosco I (1543-1588)
http://www.hoasm.org/IVM/FerraboscoI.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_Ferrabosco...

Alfonso Ferrabosco II (1572 [?] - 1628)
http://www.hoasm.org/IVM/FerraboscoII.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfonso_Ferrabosco...

Alfonso Ferrabosco III (c.1610-1662)
http://www.hoasm.org/IVM/FerraboscoIII.html

Cum Grano Salis   Link to this

Amongst other Googles One was Mentioned along with Laniere:

Famous family in the music world [e.g] lyra viol manuscripts
I Alfonso 1543 -88; Alfonso(II) English composer 1575-1628 ;
then his sons Alfonso (III) 1610-1660 ; Henry 1615-58 ;John 1626-82 Ely Cath. organist 1662-1612;
White hall was bless by their presence.
lifted from
http://books.google.com/books?id=f7QnoaxNKeUC&p...

In the palace {WH} was a private theatre, with a little stage, the contrivance of Inigo Jones, whom Ephraim Hardcastle, in the Somerset House Gazette, does not hesitate to call "the father of scene-painting in England." Elegant masques were performed here by "his Majesty's servants," in the reign of James I. "These pieces," says Horace Walpole, "were sometimes composed at the command of the king in compliment to the nuptials of certain lords and ladies of the Court;" and he grows positively eloquent in their praise, as a "custom productive of much good, by encouraging marriage among the young nobility." Ben Jonson was the poet, Inigo Jones the inventor of the decorations, Laniere and Ferrabosco composed the symphonies, and the king, queen, and young nobility danced in the interludes. To such an extent was the splendour of these "shows" celebrated at the rival court of the Tuilleries and Versailles that the same author asserts that they formed the model which was followed in the celebrated fĂȘtes of Louis le Grand.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

Ferrabosco brought the madrigal to England. While he did not start the madrigal craze there--that really began in 1588 with the publication of Nicholas Yonge's Musica transalpina, the popularity of which was such that the madrigal instantly became the most prevalent type of composition in England--he did plant the seeds for this development.

In Ely Catherdrall there be on John Ferrabosco Organist 1662-1682.
lifted from
http://books.google.com/books?id=RCwJAAAAIAAJ&p...

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.

References

  • 1664
    • Sep
  • 1667