8 Annotations

TerryF   Link to this

The Steelyard is located off the Thames near the lower right-hand corner of this segment of the 1746 map of London, etc. http://www.motco.com/map/81002/SeriesSearchPlat...

language hat   Link to this

The tavern is so named because it was within the precincts of the Steelyard, "the place on the north bank of the Thames above London Bridge where the Merchants of the Hanse had their establishment" (OED). The word goes back to the 14th century:
[1394 in N. & Q. Ser. X. VI. 413/2 In civitate Londonia.. in Curia Calibis.]
1474 in Rymer Foedera XI. 796/1 Quandam Curiam Londoniæ sitam vocatam Staelhoeff aliàs Stylgerd.
1475 Rolls of Parlt. VI. 123/1 The said Merchauntes of the Hanze, shuld have a certeyn place within the Citee of London, called the Stylehof, otherwise called the Stileyerd.

The name is "a mistranslation of MLG. stâlhof (whence G. stahlhof in historical use), f. stâl sample, pattern + hof courtyard. The word stâl, pattern, being homophonous with the word for steel, the meaning of the compound was misunderstood."

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Expansion on LH.
Steelyard or as OED says:
Homes to the merchants of the Hanseatic [Baltic] who brought merchanise and stored it and weighed the wares and while one be waiting for the transaction to be completed offered nice Rhinish wines, there be four Rhine Inns
The OED:[f. STEEL n.1 + YARD n.1; a mistranslation of MLG. stâlhof (whence G. stahlhof in historical use), f. stâl sample, pattern + hof courtyard. The word stâl, pattern, being homophonous with the word for steel, the meaning of the compound was misunderstood.]
Stillyard stileyard stylehof stileyerd or as rhw OED puts it.
Forms: erd), 6 stiliard, (stuliard, -yard), 6-7 stilyard, (6 stwyl-, stylyarde), stilliard(e, (6 stylliarde, 7 styllard, stilliart, stillyart, stilliyard), 6-7, 9 stillyard (6 -yarde. 6 stel(e)yard(e, 6-7, 9
alt:The following passage has been supposed to be an example of this word:
1531 in Lett. & Papers For. & Dom. Hen. VIII, V. 104/2 [The beam of] le Hanzes Hangis, [called] the Stilliarde Beme.
But prob. ‘Stilliarde Beme’ means the public weighing scales kept at the Steelyard. The relation to the older word STELLEER, which rests ultimately on the sole authority of Cotgrave, is obscure.]
A balance consisting of a lever with unequal arms, which moves on a fulcrum; the article to be weighed is suspended from the shorter arm, and a counterpoise is caused to slide upon the longer arm until equilibrium is produced, its place on this arm (which is notched or graduated) showing the weight: = Roman balance (ROMAN a.1 15a). Also pl. and a pair of steelyards.

1. The place on the north bank of the Thames above London Bridge where the Merchants of the Hanse had their establishment. Also, the merchants collectively.
[1394 in N. & Q. Ser. X. VI. 413/2 In civitate Londonia..in Curia Calibis.]
1474 in Rymer Foedera (1710) XI. 796/1 Quandam Curiam Londoniæ sitam vocatam Staelhoeff aliàs Stylgerd
up to 1648; the power of the Hanseatic group be weakening........
c. A tavern within the precincts of the Steelyard where ‘Rhenish wine’ was sold.
1636 J. TAYLOR (Water P.) Trav. through Signes Zodiack D7, There are foure Houses in London that doe sell Rhennish Wine, inhabited onely by Dutchmen; namely. The Stilliyard [etc.].
....1611 COTGR. s.v. Coquillé, Pain coquillé, a fashion of an hard~crusted loafe, somewhat like our Stillyard Bunne.....
1657 Burton's Diary (1828) I. 181 We make no distinction of Hambrough or stillyard merchants.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Steelyard: a pix. and info ;
http://www1.fis.uc.pt/museu/18ing.htm

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

LH comments http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5974/
A nice place to get out of the brisk aire waiting for the ride. A possible reason for the visit.
Alhallows stairs to pick up the ride to Whitehall.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"The Steelyard, from the German Stalhof, was in the Middle Ages the main trading base of the Hanseatic League in London." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steelyard

Alex   Link to this

Just wanted to say helloy

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References

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