1893 text

That excellent and by all Physicians, approved, China drink, called by the Chineans Tcha, by other nations Tay alias Tee, is sold at the Sultaness Head Coffee-House, in Sweetings Rents, by the Royal Exchange, London.” “Coffee, chocolate, and a kind of drink called tee, sold in almost every street in 1659.”—Rugge’s Diurnal. It is stated in “Boyne’s Trade Tokens,” ed. Williamson, vol. i., 1889, p. 593 “that the word tea occurs on no other tokens than those issued from ‘the Great Turk’ (Morat ye Great) coffeehouse in Exchange Alley. The Dutch East India Company introduced tea into Europe in 1610, and it is said to have been first imported into England from Holland about 1650. The English “East India Company” purchased and presented 2 lbs. of tea to Charles II. in 1660, and 23 lbs. in 1666. The first order for its importation by the company was in 1668, and the first consignment of it, amounting to 143 lbs., was received from Bantam in 1669 (see Sir George Birdwood’s “Report on the Old Records at the India Office,” 1890, p. 26). By act 12 Car. II., capp. 23, 24, a duty of 8d. per gallon was imposed upon the infusion of tea, as well as on chocolate and sherbet.

5 Annotations

Mary   Link to this

The first samples of tea reached England between 1652 and 1654. Another luxury drink reserved for the moneyed classes. Portugal and Holland were both earlier than England in discovering the delights of tea and it was only later in the 17th Century that the English tea trade began to flourish through the East India Company. It seems likely that the backgrounds of both Charles II (years of exile in Holland) and his Portuguese wife Catherine of Braganza may have influenced the increasing popularity of tea during the latter part of the century.

In 1699 40,000lbs of tea were imported into England and by 1708 this figure had risen to 240,000 lbs in one year.

vincent   Link to this

google :tcha tee tea and get great references
Ready for a good cuppa? [Tea (Thea sinensis)is an evergreen plant of the Camellia family] "....Excellent and by all Physitians approved China drink, .." London's Mercuricus Politicus sept 23 1658
Tea is an infusion and requires boiling (not hot, not nearly-boiling) water, as Mrs. Beeton took pains to point out in 1861:
1658 :cost of "t" 10L(2400d) a Pound (avoisdupois) that is 250 approx cups of the every ready for a 11d:
now for 20 tea bags of green tea 3$ /2L or 10 P(25d) a cup
How how come it came the In thing ?
"...Tea came to continental Europe before it reached England, so why was it only England which developed a unique culture of tea drinking, with tea becoming the national drink of the whole people? Of course, there were many reasons. Samuel Twining, 9th-generation chairman of the Twinings tea company of England, founded in 1706, said--to this reporter's surprise--that the real cause was "snobbery"!
Rarity gives things value, and value is a source of human pride; Twining ascribes the main credit for creating this national drink to the monarchs, starting with Charles II, who taxed tea heavily from the 17th century onwards. After English tea taxes were first introduced, they increased repeatedly to reach a high of 119%. The heavier the duty, the dearer tea grew, and the more insatiable consumers' demand for it became. The "conspicuous consumption" described by the economist Veblen is by no means only a modern phenomenon.
Another product from China found its way into Europeans' lives at the same time as tea: tea sets made of porcelain, which was previously unknown in Europe..."
http://www.taiwaninfo.org/info/sinorama/8407/84...
Story : why green tea became black? because it took 18 months to reach the Thames Customs House.
For more bumff on tee Google
' tcha tee tea '
so many sources

Token   Link to this

"By act 12 Car. II., capp. 23, 24, a duty of 8d. per gallon was imposed upon the infusion of tea, as well as on chocolate and sherbet."

Ah, the "child of independence" is already in utero:

http://www.hmce.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/cha...

Bill   Link to this

When I came to my Friend's House in a Morning, I used to be ask'd, if I had my Morning Draught yet? I am now ask'd, if I have yet had my Tea?
---An essay on ways and means for inclosing, fallowing, planting. W. Mackintosh, 1729.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

5 The "Mercurius Politicus" of September 30th, 1658, sets forth: "That excellent and by all Physicians, approved, China drink, called by the Chineans Tcha, by other nations Tay alias Tee, is sold at the Sultancss Head Coffee-House, in Sweetings Rents, by the Royal Exchange, London." "Coffee, chocolate, and a kind of drink called tee, sold in almost every street in 1659."—Rugge's Diurnal. It is stated in " Boyne's Trade Tokens," ed. Williamson, vol. i., 1889, p. 593, "that the word tea occurs on no other tokens than those issued from 'the Great Turk' (Morat y" Great) coffeehouse in Exchange Alley. The Dutch East India Company introduced tea into Europe in 1610, and it is said to have been first imported into England from Holland about 1650. The English "East India Company" purchased and presented 2 lbs. of tea to Charles II. in 1664, and 23$ lbs. in 1666. The first order for its importation by the company was in 1668, and the first consignment of it, amounting to I43[ lbs., was received from Bantam in 1669 (see Sir George Birdwood's "Report on the Old Records at the India Office," 1890, p. 26). By act 12 Car. II., capp. 23, 24, a duty of 8d. per gallon was imposed upon the infusion of tea, as well as on chocolate and sherbet.
http://books.google.com/books?id=HsUUAAAAYAAJ&p...

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References

  • 1660
  • 1667