22 Annotations

David Quidnunc  •  Link

ENGLISH: SLANG Dictionary, 18th Century
http://www.holoweb.net/~liam/dict2/

"CANTING DICTIONARY, 1736"

"A Collection of the Canting Words and Terms, both ancient and modern, used by Beggars, Gypsies, Cheats, House-Breakers, Shop-Lifters, Foot-Pads, Highway-Men &c. [and, let's hope, Pepys]"

"Taken from the Universal Etymological English Dictionary, by N. Bailey, London, 1737, Vol II"

David Quidnunc  •  Link

AMERICAN -- Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable
http://www.bartleby.com/81/

". . . comprises over 18,000 entries that reveal the etymologies, trace the origins and otherwise catalog 'words with a tale to tell.'" (1898 edition)

David Quidnunc  •  Link

ENGLISH English vs. American English
http://www.accomodata.co.uk/amlish.htm

This site might be useful in interpreting an odd word used by an American or Briton posting an annotation. This is an easy-to-read parallel listing of different words with the same meaning -- American on the left, English on the right, on one long web page. Not absolutely foolproof: "crazy bone" for example, is supposed to be the American equivalent of the English "funny bone," but I've always heard "funny bone" used here in the Northeastern U.S. "Crazy bone" is probably used somewhere else in the country.

David Quidnunc  •  Link

AUSTRALIAN -- Macquarie Dictionary
http://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/

(For Australian slang, click on "Book of Slang.")

There doesn't seem to be a key online to the pronunciation symbols used in the dictionary.

Why an Australian dictionary? Oz may be on the other side of the planet from Pepys, but word meanings and traditions may be present there that have died out elsewhere, and some of our annotators have been Australian.

Paul Brewster  •  Link

OED
Just out of curiosity I ran a search through the quotations on my OED-CD looking for Pepys and found the SP has 1,890 quotes attributed to him. To place this in context I checked Sharespeare. No contest. Shakes shows up 29,297 times.

Sam Sampson  •  Link

Canting Dictionary, 1736
A Collection of the Canting Words and Terms, both ancient and modern, used by Beggars, Gypsies, Cheats, House-Breakers, Shop-Lifters, Foot-Pads, Highway-Men, &c;

"Taken from The Universal Etymological English Dictionary, by N. Bailey, London, 1737, Vol. II, and transcrib'd into XML Most Diligently by Liam Quin"

http://www.holoweb.net/~liam/dict2/

Great for finding some esoteric word-meanings. It may well have been in SP's Library.

Sam Sampson  •  Link

Apologies David
I missed your reference to "Canting Dictionary" above.

David Quidnunc  •  Link

TRANSLATION site: Altavista's Babelfish
http://babelfish.altavista.com/

French, Spanish, Italian, German, Portugese, Russian to English or vice-versa (also Chinese, Japanese and Korean). You can translate a whole block of text or a web page.

Pauline  •  Link

Alan Bedford on Sun 14 Mar 2004, 1:08 am | Link
“The Seaman’s Grammar and Dictionary” was written by Captain John Smith, who was one of the founders of the Jamestown colony in Virginia. The two-volume set also contains sections on the duties of naval officers and on the conduct of battles.

A facsimile of a 1691 edition of the Seamans Grammar (in Adobe Reader .pdf format) may be found at: http://www.shipbrook.com/jeff/seamansgrammar/

Bradford  •  Link

"Pepysian"s rejoice! A sidebar in the September 2005 "OED News" e-letter

http://www.oed.com/newsletters/2005-09/

shows that the "OED Online" now includes the word "Pepysian." No doubt it is presented in its adjectival form; but if Austen can have her Janeites, and Henry James his Jacobeans, surely, dear readers and annotators, there deserves to be a noun for us Pepysians.

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