1893 text

A woollen cloth. “Saye clothe serge.” — Palsgrave.

2 Annotations

vicente   Link to this

... Serge (from ancient French saie which derives from the ... for tie-making characterized
by a cloth armor and ... and good elasticity, similar to the serge but smoother ...
http://www.madeincomo.it/autun_inverno_en.html
Say
(Say), v. t. To try; to assay. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
Say
(Say), n. [OE. saie, F. saie, fr. L. saga, equiv. to sagum, sagus, a coarse woolen mantle; cf. Gr. sa`gos. See Sagum.]
1. A kind of silk or satin. [Obs.]
Thou say, thou serge, nay, thou buckram lord!
Shak.
2. A delicate kind of serge, or woolen cloth. [Obs.]
His garment neither was of silk nor say.
Spenser

http://www.bootlegbooks.com/Reference/Webster/d...
Northern French and Flemish serges(sagie, sagie, saie) were exported 12th century.
other spellings saye saie
to say another meaning altogether.

Bill   Link to this

SAY [sayette, F] a thin sort of Stuff.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

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References

  • 1661