8 Annotations

vicente   Link to this

Built Woolwich 1646 Adventure, 44 guns
http://www.royal-arsenal.com/warship.html

The English naval officer Robert Sansum During the Commonwealth, Robert Sansum commanded a number of ships: From 1651 to 1653, he commanded the small frigate, the Bryer. From 1654 to 1655, he commanded the 4th Rate Adventure. From 1655 to 1660 (the Restoration), he commanded the larger 4th Rate, the Portsmouth. This information is from R.C. Anderson's List of English Naval Captains 1642-1660, published by the Society for Nautical Research in 1964. I have found this to be a very valuable source. "Cntr F" and adventure to find

http://anglo-dutch-wars.blogspot.com/archives/2...
snippets of Dutch Navy efforts in 1600's

vicente   Link to this

from another list: 4th rate
Adventure length 94' w27' 9" depth 13' 10" tons-385: men-150 guns-32

Pedro   Link to this

The Adventure in 1661.

“Aboard the Adventure off the coast of Portugal in 1661, the crew went fishing for dolphin: after the master’s mate had struck one on the head, it was hauled into the ship’s boat and killed with an axe, then fried for supper.”

(Gentlemen and Tarpaulins...J.D.Davies.)

Pedro   Link to this

The Adventure

On the 18th of May 1661 Hugh Hide, a kinsman of the Lord Chancellor, took command of the Adventure.

Pedro   Link to this

The Adventure

When the Trumpeter of the Adventure died in 1661, he was “sewn up in a canvas bag, with a culverin shott at his head and another at his feet” and heaved overboard.

(Gentlemen and Tarpaulins by J. D. Davies)

Pedro   Link to this

The Adventure.

Sandwich would meet de Ruyter in the Bay of Fuengirola on the 19th August 1661, and in his journal says that he was told by de Ruyter...

"He had fell in company with three English men of war on the 10/20 July, the Assistance...the Adventure, Captain Hugh Hide commander and 4 merchant ships which he thought were laden with horse for Portugal."

Michael Tatnell   Link to this

In "Pepys' Navy" J D Davies states that: "The Adventure of 1646 was considered such a successful design that forty years later, one authority was still proposing to base the dimensions of the new Fourth Rate on her; the Navy Board demurred and suggetsed larger ships, though they had to be particularly tactful as the "authority" in question was King James II and VII." The point is illustrated by a photograph of a contemporary model of The Adventure.

Michael Tatnell   Link to this

In "Pepys' Navy" J D Davies states that: "Seamen who performed exceptional service might sometimes receive financial rewards or medals. These had long been awarded to officers, but from about 1649 or 1650 onwards Parliament awarded them to men as well. The first grant for which definite evidence exists gave every man of The Adventure a medal worth five shillings for an action against fire ships at Harwich in 1650 (but the Captain's medal was valued at £50).

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References

  • 1661