2 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

Per L&M Companion:

The Captain Thomas Elliott, incorrectly referenced to at vii 142, 143 [June 3rd. 1666], as captain of the 'Portland' (which was in fact commanded by Richard Haddock) must have been Thomas Elliott of the 'Revenge,' who was well known to both Coventry and Pepys. In 1669 his interest as a baliff of Aldeburgh was engaged on Pepys's behalf in a parliamentary bye-election to no avail. He served in the Third Dutch War and had died by 1688. 'Very stout but given to plunder', (Coventry).

Bill   Link to this

ELLIOT, Thomas,—was, in 1664, appointed commander of the Catherine, a ship of war hired from the merchants; and, in 1665, being removed into the Saphire frigate, he fell in, during the month of November, with the Dutch fleet of busses, off the Dogger, under the protection of four men of war; nevertheless, such was his activity and address, that he captured three and dispersed the rest. He was soon after (in all likelihood on account of this very piece of service) promoted to the Revenge, a third rate; and sent in the ensuing spring, commodore of a squadron of six sail sent to the northward, to check the depredations that might be attempted on our commerce, by any flying squadrons, or single cruisers, of the enemy. He returned in time to contribute his share towards the victory gained by the duke of York; and still continuing in the Revenge, was present at both the actions, which took place the following year, when the fleet was under the command of prince Rupert and the duke of Albemarle. After the return of the fleet into port, he was removed into the Anne, a ship of the same rate as the Revenge. He continued to command the Anne till the end of the year 1667, when he was appointed to the Reserve. Peace being concluded soon after this, we meet with nothing further relative to captain Elliot, till the year 1672, at which time we find him captain of the Yorke, one of the squadron under sir Robert Holmes, at the time he attacked the Smyrna fleet. In this action, as he had the credit of deserving, in common, it must be confessed, with the rest of the commanders, so had he the honour of obtaining the highest reputation, for gallantry and good conduct. He continued to command the same ship, and had a further opportunity of distinguishing himself in the action with the Dutch, which took place in the month of June following. Being severely wounded in that engagement, he was, on his recovery, promoted to the London, a very fine second rate.
---Biographia Navalis. J. Charnock, 1794.

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References

  • 1666
    • Jun