Monday 9 December 1667

All the morning busy at the office, doing very considerable business, and thither comes Sir G. Carteret to talk with me; who seems to think himself safe as to his particular, but do doubt what will become of the whole kingdom, things being so broke in pieces. He tells me that the King himself did the other day very particularly tell the whole story of my Lord Sandwich’s not following the Dutch ships, with which he is charged; and shews the reasons of it to be the only good course he could have taken, and do discourse it very knowingly. This I am glad of, though, as the King is now, his favour, for aught I see, serves very little in stead at this day, but rather is an argument against a man; and the King do not concern himself to relieve or justify any body, but is wholly negligent of everybody’s concernment. This morning I was troubled with my Lord Hinchingbroke’s sending to borrow 200l. of me; but I did answer that I had none, nor could borrow any; for I am resolved I will not be undone for any body, though I would do much for my Lord Sandwich — for it is to answer a bill of exchange of his, and I perceive he hath made use of all other means in the world to do it, but I am resolved to serve him, but not ruin myself, as it may be to part with so much of the little I have by me to keep if I should by any turn of times lose the rest. At noon I to the ‘Change, and there did a little business, and among other things called at Cade’s, the stationer, where he tells me how my Lord Gerard is troubled for several things in the House of Commons, and in one wherein himself is concerned; and, it seems, this Lord is a very proud and wicked man, and the Parliament is likely to order him. Then home to dinner, and then a little abroad, thinking to have gone to the other end of the town, but it being almost night I would not, but home again, and there to my chamber, and all alone did there draw up my answer to Sir Rob. Brookes’s letter, and when I had done it went down to my clerks at the office for their opinion which at this time serves me to very good purpose, they having many things in their heads which I had not in the businesses of the office now in dispute. Having done with this, then I home and to supper very late, and to bed. My [wife] being yet very ill of her looseness, by which she is forced to lie from me to-night in the girl’s chamber.

11 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Philosophical Transactions, Monday, December 9. 1667

An Account of the Experiment of Transfusion
Practised upon a Man in London
Phil. Trans. Numb. 30, 1666-1667 2, 557-559
An Account of the Experiment of Transfusion, performed in London Nov. 23, 1667, upon the Person of Arthur Coga, at Arundel House, in the Presence of many considerable and intelligent Spectators, under the Management of Dr. Richard Lower and Dr. Edmund King ; by the latter of whom the Relation was drawn up. N° 30, p. 557.

The Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London, Volume 1
By Royal Society (Great Britain) Abridged Charles Hutton, George Shaw, Richard Pearson London: Printed by and for C. and R. Baldwin New Bridge-Street, Blackfriars., 1809
http://is.gd/gtsQ1

Reprint edition in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine 75 (2002) pp. 293-297
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC258...

Spin2Win   Link to this

"My [wife] being yet very ill of her looseness, by which she is forced to lie from me to-night in the girl’s chamber."

Poor Deb. Welcome to the family. Hope you don't get what she's got!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I wonder what degree of groveling was required in refusing young Lord Hinchingbroke's request.

"My Lord,

Knowing that every bit of bread in my mouth and every thread upon my body does but come from your father's gracious benevolence, I have endeavoured, labored, sought with all might and steadfast purpose to obtain credit for the sum which you have requested. But, alas, sir, I find that credit in the City is unobtainable for a humble servant of the King in these hard, unfeeling times. And lacking in my own means at present the funds needed to fulfill your request, I must, with a full and heavy heart and the deepest shame, and with the greatest regret, respectfully decline your request."

"Well?" Sam eyes Bess who rolls eyes...

"I suppose given Lord Sandwich might one day return to full favor, it's more sensible than telling the spendthrift little... to go... himself." Bess sighs.

"And speaking of spendthrift little...There's young Penn Jr. coming up the walk." Sam peers out windown. "No doubt wanting me to fund a pamphlet his father won't give him money for printing."

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and when I had done it went down to my clerks at the office for their opinion which at this time serves me to very good purpose, they having many things in their heads which I had not in the businesses of the office now in dispute"

A particularly valuable revelation for any manager -- your staff members are valuable resources; they actually might know something you don't. Sentences like this, as well as his recent entries regarding dinners with his team, make me realize why Sam inspired such dedication among people like Will Hewer and other subordinates. Must have been refreshing in those days to have a boss like Sam!

Ruben   Link to this

"My [wife] being yet very ill of her looseness, by which she is forced to lie from me to-night in the girl’s chamber."

How unkind of Samuel!
Considering her diarrhea, he should have been the one to lie away in the girl's chamber and not his poor wife!

Ruben   Link to this

"and when I had done it went down to my clerks at the office for their opinion which at this time serves me to very good purpose, they having many things in their heads which I had not in the businesses of the office now in dispute”

You are right, Todd.
I presume Hewer was employed by Sam because of his family connections and estate, but as he was an intelligent and industrious employee, they developed a relationship that went over the professional, became personal and lasted all of their lifes.
When Pepys retired he did not have a house in London and went to live at Hewer's place.
This is not the first time I ask myself about this close relationship.
May be Pepys looked at Hewer like the son he never had (in spite there was not an age gap),or a brother (not being very proud of his own brother).
Consider these two old gentlemen, next century, with a King that came to rule from Holland, from all places, living in a big house in Clapham, speaking about what should have been if this and that...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Ruben, I think the idea was probably Bess'. Deb could do any assist she'd need and she probably didn't want to risking ruining their good sheets, etc. To his credit Sam's always shown great consideration for Bess' illnesses.

lancelot   Link to this

Gorgeous find, Terry. Are you of the opinion that this is the "considerable business" referred to?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

lancelot, no. Nice pickup on what must have been the term de jour to impress, I guess.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

considerable
mid-15c., "capable of being considered," from M.L. considerabilis "worthy to be considered," from L. considerare (see consider). Meaning "pretty large" is from 1640s (implied in considerably).
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=consid...

So, big-deal?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

" This morning I was troubled with my Lord Hinchingbroke’s sending to borrow 200l. of me; but I did answer that I had none, nor could borrow any...."

Here, RG, is how it went down epistolarily between Hinch and Pepys.
_____

LORD HINCHINGBROKE TO PEPYS. December, 9, 1667.

SlR,

There being a letter of exchange come, of about 250/. 8s. payable to the Spanish ambassador within four or five days, my father having writ* very earnestly that it may be punctually paid, and Mr. Moore f having not any way to procure it, makes me take the liberty of troubling you to desire your assistance in it.

If you can with any convenience do it, you will do a great kindness to my father and me, who am,

Dear cousin, Your most affectionate cousin and humble servant,

HlNCHINGBROKE.
_____

PEPYS TO LORD HINCHINGBROKE.

My Lord, Dec. 9, 1667.

My condition is such, and hath been ever since the credit of the King's assignments was broke by the failure of the bankers, f that I have not been able, these six months, to raise a farthing for answering my most urgent occasions.

I am heartily afflicted for this difficulty that is upon your Lordship, and if upon my endeavours with the bankers I can procure any money, I will not fail to give your Lordship it; being very desirous of the preservation of my Lord's credit, as well as for all his other concernments.
Your Lordship's obedient servant,

S. Pepys.
-----
* Endorsed by Pepys, " Dec. 19, 1667 60/. this day lent my Lord of Sandwich." To this subject Pepys has alluded several times during this year, 1667. Thus, "June 23," he mentions "the King's declaration, in behalf of the bankers, to make good their assignments for money;" which, he adds, "is very good, and will, I hope, secure me."
-
The life, journals and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, &c. Volume I, pp 122ff.
http://books.google.com/books?id=gBc6AAAAcAAJ&p...

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