Monday 15 July 1667

[Continued from yesterday. P.G.] …so as I was not able to go to-day to wait on the Duke of York with my fellows, but was forced in bed to write the particulars for their discourse there, and kept my bed all day, and anon comes Mrs. Turner, and new-dressed my foot, and did it so, that I was at much ease presently, and so continued all day, so as I slept much and well in the daytime, and in the evening rose and eat something, where our poor Jane very sad for the death of her poor brother, who hath left a wife and two small children. I did give her 20s. in money, and what wine she needed, for the burying him. This evening come to see me Pelling, and we did sing together, and he sings well indeed, and after supper I was willing to go to bed to ease my foot again, which I did, and slept well all night.

5 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Sir William Coventry to Sandwich
Written from: [St. James']
Date: 15 July 1667

Has been reluctant to write when nothing could be imparted "but our losses, or our fears". We are now told that we shall have a Peace, but the writer feels neither sure of it, nor hopeful that its terms will give grounds of joy, "unless compared with the mischiefs which may probably attend a war"

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Good man Janewise, Sam. And your biographer, Ms. Tomalin remembered it.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

Doctors are needful, but Nurses can be more helpful and useful for sprained muscles.

L. K. van Marjenhoff   Link to this

Sam has certainly been fortunate to know caring women named Mrs. Turner.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Now we know why yesterday's entry was as elaborate as it is: Sam wrote in in bed nursing his foot.

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