Monday 10 September 1666

All the morning clearing our cellars, and breaking in pieces all my old lumber, to make room, and to prevent fire. And then to Sir W. Batten’s, and dined; and there hear that Sir W. Rider says that the towne is full of the report of the wealth that is in his house, and would be glad that his friends would provide for the safety of their goods there. This made me get a cart; and thither, and there brought my money all away. Took a hackney-coach myself (the hackney-coaches now standing at Allgate). Much wealth indeed there is at his house. Blessed be God, I got all mine well thence, and lodged it in my office; but vexed to have all the world see it. And with Sir W. Batten, who would have taken away my hands before they were stowed. But by and by comes brother Balty from sea, which I was glad of; and so got him, and Mr. Tooker, and the boy, to watch with them all in the office all night, while I upon Jane’s coming went down to my wife, calling at Deptford, intending to see Bagwell, but did not ‘ouvrir la porte comme je’ did expect. So down late to Woolwich, and there find my wife out of humour and indifferent, as she uses upon her having much liberty abroad.

13 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

September 10. I went againe to the ruines, for it was now no longer a Citty.

http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/1914/ed...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

”“…. But by and by comes Brother Balty from sea, which I was glad of; and so got him and Mr. Tooker and the boy to watch with them all in the office all night, while I, upon Janes coming, went down to my wife; calling at Deptford, intending to Bagwell, but did not 'ouvrir la porte comme je' [ open the door like I ] did expect. ….” http://www.pepys.info/bits3.html#thirty

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Well, "to see Bagwell" -- but "to Bagwell" might work for Pepys.

cape henry   Link to this

"...but vexed to have all the world see it." This is an aspect of the period that has intrigued me nearly from the beginning of the diary, as Pepys began to accumulate his wealth: the stunning lack of security. Most reading this will routinely carry small fortunes around with them in the form of semi-secure credit cards, and have money in banks and funds and whatnot. But most would not think of openly transporting and storing great sums the way that is often depicted here - like asking a cabbie to help load the stacks of currency into the trunk to take it home. I once knew a pawn broker who kept an amazing store of gold objects in his home, from wedding rings to cigarette lighters to spoons and a solid gold Rolls Royce gearshift knob, but he kept them in an armored room in his attic and transported the things himself. Obviously Pepys is a bit concerned about it, but not enough to do anything really differently than he has.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...while I upon Jane’s coming went down to my wife, calling at Deptford, intending to see Bagwell, but did not ‘ouvrir la porte comme je’ did expect. So down late to Woolwich, and there find my wife out of humour and indifferent, as she uses upon her having much liberty abroad."

Sam, you slay me...While the most noble person in the Diary, Jane Birch, is rushing back to help you (when she should be grabbing whatever she can for what you did to poor Wayneman...) you are sneaking off to Deptford to see the poor woman you forced to be your mistress and complaining that Bess is too indifferent and out of humor. Perhaps Bess has guessed you aren't exactly anxious to have her with you...

Indifferent, eh?...Well...Some of us warned you...

"Cat in the cradle and the silver spoon...
Little boy and the man-in-the-moon...

'When you comin' home, Sam...?' 'I don't know when but we'll get together then, Bess. You know we'll have a good time, then...'"

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Heaven...

"What is the fellow complaining about?" Sam gripes to a staring Bess... "'forced her...' It's not like I fired Bagwell for not making his wife promptly available during the fire's immediate aftermath."

"Since he's dead already, would it be against the rules to beat him to death with a pan?" Bess hisses to St. Peter...Who hands her a pan.

Ruben   Link to this

"All the morning clearing our cellars, and breaking in pieces all my old lumber, to make room, and to prevent fire"

Lumber can be timber but I see in my dictionary that it can also be "refuse, household stuff of small value".

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"breaking in pieces all my old lumber"
I don't see how it could contribute to fire prevention!

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"'ouvrir la porte comme je' did expect"
Is he talking about penetration here?

JKM   Link to this

I'm wondering what happened to Pepys' neighbor Sir J. Minnes. There he was lying deathly ill and then the Great Fire of London started. He's had better weeks....

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: "Is he talking about penetration here?"

I think we're talking about "access" -- if, that is, she even opened the literal door to let him in...

CGS   Link to this

"...but did not ‘ouvrir la porte comme je’ did expect...."
but did not raise the drawer bridge seeing that I did expect!!!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Sir George Carteret to Sandwich
Written from: Whitehall

Date: 10 September 1666

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 75, fol(s). 475

Document type: Holograph. With seal of arms.

Expresses his surprise that Lord Sandwich should have received but one letter from him since his Lordship's arrival in Spain, the present letter being the sixth which the writer has sent to him. Adds, with reference to the great fire: - "God hath preserved my house in Broad Street. I wish I could give your Lordship the same account of the Wardrobe, but I am told your goods there are preserved. The Navy Office did escape the fire, so that all our books and papers are safe". http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

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