Tuesday 5 December 1665

Up and to the office, where very busy about several businesses all the morning. At noon empty, yet without stomach to dinner, having spoiled myself with fasting yesterday, and so filled with wind. In the afternoon by water, calling Mr. Stevens (who is with great trouble paying of seamen of their tickets at Deptford) and to London, to look for Captain Kingdom whom we found at home about 5 o’clock. I tried him, and he promised to follow us presently to the East India House to sign papers to-night in order to the settling the business of my receiving money for Tangier. We went and stopt the officer there to shut up. He made us stay above an houre. I sent for him; he comes, but was not found at home, but abroad on other business, and brings a paper saying that he had been this houre looking for the Lord Ashley’s order. When he looks for it, that is not the paper. He would go again to look; kept us waiting till almost 8 at night. Then was I to go home by water this weather and darke, and to write letters by the post, besides keeping the East India officers there so late. I sent for him again; at last he comes, and says he cannot find the paper (which is a pretty thing to lay orders for 100,000l. no better). I was angry; he told me I ought to give people ease at night, and all business was to be done by day. I answered him sharply, that I did [not] make, nor any honest man, any difference between night and day in the King’s business, and this was such, and my Lord Ashley should know. He answered me short. I told him I knew the time (meaning the Rump’s time) when he did other men’s business with more diligence. He cried, “Nay, say not so,” and stopped his mouth, not one word after. We then did our business without the order in less than eight minutes, which he made me to no purpose stay above two hours for the doing. This made him mad, and so we exchanged notes, and I had notes for 14,000l. of the Treasurer of the Company, and so away and by water to Greenwich and wrote my letters, and so home late to bed.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Pepys spends this day chasing prize money

"to look for Captain Kingdom whom we found at home about 5 o’clock. I tried him, and he promised to follow us presently to the East India House to sign papers to-night in order to the settling the business of my receiving money for Tangier. "

L&M note Richard Kingdom, a sub-commissioner of prizes, had an office in East India House.

***
"looking for the Lord Ashley’s order"

L&M note Lord Ashley was Treasurer of the prize commission.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M note Pepys was Tangier funds (for victuals) were to come from prize money.

cape henry   Link to this

Did anyone besides myself find this entry oddly didactic in style? Pepys usually handles this type of situation in a brief summary, without the back-and-forth we see here. The runaround he received seems to have upset him so he found it necessary to recount each step. Yet another reason this man's diary is so remarkable.

Margaret   Link to this

"I told him I knew the time (meaning the Rump’s time) when he did other men’s business with more diligence. He cried, “Nay, say not so,” and stopped his mouth, not one word after."

It sounds as if Sam is threatening him with having been on the wrong side of the political line. A bit underhanded, but it seems to have worked.

Of course, if the Rump had continued to rule England, then Sam would have happily served them. In fact, he believed that Cromwell had been a better leader than Charles.

cgs   Link to this

Good politics, always have a list of "where the bodies be buried" [tapes, photos etc ] for a rainy day.

Linda F   Link to this

The passage about making no difference between night and day on the King's business leaps off the page and is particularly vivid. As though we have just dropped into a Robert Bolt script. Always wonder how Sam keeps the pace that he does.

Jesse   Link to this

"I was angry"

Yes, indeed he was. I also (think I) notice a somewhat pugilistic style. Pepys seems to be reliving the exchange with its growing tension "I answered him sharply, ... He answered me short" and sudden relief "He cried, 'Nay say not so'" - after a punch to the Rump ;)

Mary   Link to this

'pugilistic style'?

Note the preponderance of very short sentences in this entry. Quite different from Sam's usual, more expansive style of writing and very effective in conveying the drama of an evening that had thoroughly irritated and upset him. One can clearly hear Sam and Kingdom snapping at one another.

JWB   Link to this

Bolt from out of the blue

ah yes, "Samuel of Tangier's Victuals", "A Jacobite for a Season".

What was it Bolt had More respond to his jailor's Captain Kingdom-like attitude? Something like : "Jesus, save us from simple men". Some days you just don't want to be reminded of the 60's & "the best & the brightest".

cgs   Link to this

money problems again,
'... who is with great trouble paying of seamen of their tickets at Deptford) ..."

See 'istory does repeat itself, no monies for the 'oi Pollloi, only for the prize takers.

All that grumbling at the Palace , "where is the spice, we are waiting" Cannot share the loot with them their tars and especially with that acting clerk, it is for the men and women of the bed chambers.
spoken in chambers "let them eat eels"

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Sam's usually more cautious about the past, rightly I think supposing his own could be dragged up...He must have been truly livid. As anyone would be after waiting hours to have the clerk tell you it's now after hours, we're closed.

If only the King minded his business so well as Sam does for him...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Reviewing the Situation

I'm reviewing the situation.
If you want to eat -- you've got to earn a bob!
Is it such a humiliation
For a robber to perform an honest job?
So a job I'm getting, possibly,
I wonder who my boss'll be?
I wonder if he'll take to me...?
What bonuses he'l make to me...?
I'll start at eight and finish late,
At normal rate, and all..but wait!

...I think I'd better think it out again.

What happens when I'm seventy?
Must come a time...seventy.
When you're old, and it's cold
And who cares if you live or you die,
Your one consolation's the money
You may have put by...

I'm reviewing the situation.
I'm a bad 'un and a bad 'un I shall stay!
You'll be seeing no transformation,
But it's wrong to be a rogue in ev'ry way.

I don't want nobody hurt for me,
Or made to do the dirt for me.
This rotten life is not for me.
It's getting far too hot for me.
Don't want no one to rob for me.
But who will find a job for me,
There is no in between for me
But who will change the scene for me?

...I think I'd better think it out again!

(... *Oliver* ! the British musical, with music and lyrics by Lionel Bart. excerpted ) http://www.lyricsondemand.com/soundtracks/o/oli...

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