Monday 27 November 1665

Up, and being to go to wait on the Duke of Albemarle, who is to go out of towne to Oxford to-morrow, and I being unwilling to go by water, it being bitter cold, walked it with my landlady’s little boy Christopher to Lambeth, it being a very fine walke and calling at half the way and drank, and so to the Duke of Albemarle, who is visited by every body against his going; and mighty kind to me: and upon my desiring his grace to give me his kind word to the Duke of Yorke, if any occasion there were of speaking of me, he told me he had reason to do so; for there had been nothing done in the Navy without me. His going, I hear, is upon putting the sea business into order, and, as some say, and people of his owne family, that he is agog to go to sea himself the next year. Here I met with a letter from Sir G. Carteret, who is come to Cranborne, that he will be here this afternoon and desires me to be with him. So the Duke would have me dine with him. So it being not dinner time, I to the Swan, and there found Sarah all alone in the house … So away to the Duke of Albemarle again, and there to dinner, he most exceeding kind to me to the observation of all that are there. At dinner comes Sir G. Carteret and dines with us. After dinner a great deal alone with Sir G. Carteret, who tells me that my Lord hath received still worse and worse usage from some base people about the Court. But the King is very kind, and the Duke do not appear the contrary; and my Lord Chancellor swore to him “by – I will not forsake my Lord of Sandwich.” Our next discourse is upon this Act for money, about which Sir G. Carteret comes to see what money can be got upon it. But none can be got, which pleases him the thoughts of, for, if the Exchequer should succeede in this, his office would faile. But I am apt to think at this time of hurry and plague and want of trade, no money will be got upon a new way which few understand. We walked, Cocke and I, through the Parke with him, and so we being to meet the Vice-Chamberlayne to-morrow at Nonesuch, to treat with Sir Robert Long about the same business, I into London, it being dark night, by a hackney coach; the first I have durst to go in many a day, and with great pain now for fear. But it being unsafe to go by water in the dark and frosty cold, and unable being weary with my morning walke to go on foot, this was my only way. Few people yet in the streets, nor shops open, here and there twenty in a place almost; though not above five or sixe o’clock at night. So to Viner’s, and there heard of Cocke, and found him at the Pope’s Head, drinking with Temple. I to them, where the Goldsmiths do decry the new Act, for money to be all brought into the Exchequer, and paid out thence, saying they will not advance one farthing upon it; and indeed it is their interest to say and do so. Thence Cocke and I to Sir G. Smith’s, it being now night, and there up to his chamber and sat talking, and I barbing —[shaving]— against to-morrow; and anon, at nine at night, comes to us Sir G. Smith and the Lieutenant of the Tower, and there they sat talking and drinking till past midnight, and mighty merry we were, the Lieutenant of the Tower being in a mighty vein of singing, and he hath a very good eare and strong voice, but no manner of skill. Sir G. Smith shewed me his lady’s closett, which was very fine; and, after being very merry, here I lay in a noble chamber, and mighty highly treated, the first time I have lain in London a long time.

15 Annotations

cgs   Link to this

"...it being bitter cold, walked it with my landlady’s little boy Christopher to Lambeth, it being a very fine walke and calling at half the way and drank,..."

I wonder when it became law that little boys were not allowed into where their elders be scoffing down ale on cold day?

cgs   Link to this

"...for there had been nothing done in the Navy without me. ..."
Samuell's finger be deep into the pie

cgs   Link to this

That terrible bug a boo, no credit or bail out for the navy??????

NO income from the tax farmers, OH! where have I heard that before, taxes be shy, not showing up, Oh! what a to do....
USE the Prize monies???

Margaret   Link to this

and there found Sarah all alone in the house …

Can someone fill in the missing text?

cgs   Link to this

Samuell is learning the way of the tars, a girl in every Port Of Call, just a little hanky panky, nutin' serious
{her site gives an "insite" of Samuells little extra curricular activities }

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"So it being not dinner time, I to the Swan, and there found Sarah all alone in the house and I had the opportunity a hazer what I tena a mind á hazer con ella [ to do what I had a mind to do with her ], only con [ with ] my hands -- but she was vexed at my offer a tocar la under sus jupes [ to touch her under her skirts ]; but I did once, nonobstant [ despite ] all that. So away to the Duke of Albemarle again,...." [ L&M text; my translation ]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

and there found Sarah all alone in the house …
("Let draw the curtain of charity..." Mark Twain)

Nah...Thanks Terry.

Seems like Sarah can handle our mischievous little idiot.

Heaven...

"Oh right. That was the day I got to touch her under her skirt! Ha, ha!!"

"Ha...Uh."

"Touch who? Under where?"

Uh... "What I mean, Bess, is..."

"I'm sure it was thrilling." drily sour look. "I just thank God..."

"You're quite welcome, Bessie."

"Yes...That it wasn't another little girl."

"Bess, I did my time in Purgatory...Even little Frances and (spoiler...)

...Betty Mitchell vouched for me."

Whoops...

"Betty...Mitchell..?"

"Ummn..I was going to tell you about that...Soon as we'd reached that point..."

"Bess, he's on your probation here. If you do want to send him back, anytime, for a few eons, you know..."

"Now just a minute your Almightiness...I believe we have a contract. I have fulfilled all vows, to the letter... I've it all written down here and..."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...and my Lord Chancellor swore to him “by —- I will not forsake my Lord of Sandwich.”"

Gulp...

Obviously the only thing one can get out of a prominent politician vowing not to forsake one is that poor ole Montagu is in deep, deep trouble...

Chris Faulkner   Link to this

I wonder when it became law that little boys were not allowed into where their elders be scoffing down ale on cold day?

Possibly the Defence of the Realm Act 1916(?). This is where the majority of our Licensing Laws come from. It was designed to stop munitions workers going to work drunk during WW1. There were various bits of legislation before then, but that was where it was pulled together.

Nate   Link to this

"I wonder when it became law that little boys were not allowed into where their elders be scoffing down ale on cold day?"

Probably after prohibition ended in the US. Minors can still enter establishments in California that sell food even though they sell alcohol and have a bar. Other states vary...

Carl in Boston   Link to this

no money will be got upon a new way which few understand.
There is nothing new under the sun. Then came the derivatives, which can be understood after deep reflection and prayer, and the loans for ratty houses, but none can arrive at a value these days. Now all the financial institutions are in the tank, our 401Ks are too bloody to open and look at, and what is more...there are 700 financial students at Harvard University applying for 20 jobs at Baines Capital, and it's time to take up that offer to go into the family business or marry the boss's daughter.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Defence of the Realm Act 1914 did restrict pub opening times

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defence_of_the_Rea...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Methinks Pepys's "merry" or "mighty merry" indicates they were a tad, ah, lubricated.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Our next discourse is upon this Act for money, about which Sir G. Carteret comes to see what money can be got upon it. But none can be got, which pleases him the thoughts of, for, if the Exchequer should succeede in this, his office would faile. But I am apt to think at this time of hurry and plague and want of trade, no money will be got upon a new way which few understand."

The Act for an Additional Aid of £1 1/4 m. (17 Car. II c.i passed on 31 October) would be “a new venture in English public finance” (L&M) in which bills would be paid by the Exchequer on credit, bypassing the Treasury, denying Carteret his poundage and other profits. SPOILER - On 31 Oct. we will see Pepys’s scapticism of financing on credit (a concern he will share with Carteret and the bankers); but the scheme is a success. (L&M note 6 November 1665. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/10/25/#c26...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary (in lieu of Dirk's posting it)

27: I went to the D: of Albemarle having buisinesse to recommend to his grace, going now to Oxford, where both Court, K & Parliament had ben most part of the summer: There was no small suspicion of my Lord Sandwiches permitting divers Commanders that were in the fight & action, at the taking of the E. India prizes, to break bulk, and take to their owne selves many rich things, Jewels, Silkes &c: though I believe some I could name, fill’d their pockets, my L: Sandwich himselfe had the least share: however he underwent the blame of it, & it created him Enemies, & prepossessed the L: Generall, for he spake to me of it with much zeale & concerne, & I believe laied load enough on Sandwich at Oxford.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.