Saturday 28 October 1665

Up, and sent for Thomas Willson, and broke the victualling business to him and he is mightily contented, and so am I that I have bestowed it on him, and so I to Mr. Boreman’s, where Sir W. Batten is, to tell him what I had proposed to Thomas Willson, and the newes also I have this morning from Sir W. Clerke, which is, that notwithstanding all the care the Duke of Albemarle hath taken about the putting the East India prize goods into the East India Company’s hands, and my Lord Bruncker and Sir J. Minnes having laden out a great part of the goods, an order is come from Court to stop all, and to have the goods delivered to the Sub- Commissioners of Prizes. At which I am glad, because it do vex this simple weake man, and we shall have a little reparation for the disgrace my Lord Sandwich has had in it. He tells me also that the Parliament hath given the Duke of Yorke 120,000l., to be paid him after the 1,250,000l. is gathered upon the tax which they have now given the King.1 He tells me that the Dutch have lately launched sixteen new ships; all which is great news. Thence by horsebacke with Mr. Deane to Erith, and so aboard my Lord Bruncker and dined, and very merry with him and good discourse between them about ship building, and, after dinner and a little pleasant discourse, we away and by horse back again to Greenwich, and there I to the office very late, offering my persons for all the victualling posts much to my satisfaction. Also much other business I did to my mind, and so weary home to my lodging, and there after eating and drinking a little I to bed. The King and Court, they say, have now finally resolved to spend nothing upon clothes, but what is of the growth of England; which, if observed, will be very pleasing to the people, and very good for them.

  1. This sum was granted by the Commons to Charles, with a request that he would bestow it on his brother. — B.

22 Annotations

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

Sam thinks his latest news about the prize goods will dismay Sir William Batten, and perhaps it did, but it also bewilders me.

I wonder if Charles took his percent of the funds granted through him to his brother, as academic institutions today are wont to do with scholars they shelter.

Eric Walla   Link to this

And why is the fact that the Dutch have launched sixteen new ships great news? Is it because, in combination with the money being raised, it will spur ship-building? So forget the horrors of war and salute the opportunities of an arms race?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I think Sam means by "great news" that it's of great import that the Dutch are so vastly increasing their fleet at a time when France is likely to join them against England and the English fleet is hobbled by plague and shortages of money, provisions, and men, not that it's cause to cheer.

"Mein Fuehrer, the latest Allied production figures and the most recent count of new Russian divisions facing us on the Eastern front."

"Nahhhag...Great news. Shoot him."

Michael L   Link to this

"Great news": like Robert said, "great" as in "big" or "important," not today's colloquial meaning of "really good."

Michael L   Link to this

Additionally, note that England can barely maintain and supply a fraction of the ships it has built, whereas the Dutch are doing so well that they are throwing 16 more ships into the battle! This just has to be alarming to Pepys and friends.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"He tells me that the Dutch have lately launched sixteen new ships; all which is great news. "

Yes, SP's enthusiasm for news that would materially, and adversely for the English, change the balance of forces is surprising.

Perhaps the clue is in the next sentence:
"Thence by horsebacke with Mr. Deane to Erith, and so aboard my Lord Bruncker and dined, and very merry with him and good discourse between them about ship building, and, after dinner and a little pleasant discourse, we away ..." Might SP's enthusiasm reflects a private business arrangement between he and Deane, the owner of a shipyard -- in addition to the foreseeable contribution's from Warren, for facilitating the purchase of the additional timber and masts, and Gauden, for the additional victuals. This is all icing on the cake of yesterday's improvement in SP's financial prospects.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I believe the actor Thomas Wilson played the loutish Biff in the "Back to the Future" movies which is the only excuse for the following I can offer...

"So, Pepys...I do get the Port of London victualing, right? Right?"

"Now, Biff..."

"Hello..." Knocks on Sam's head after removing periwig... "Anyone in dere? Hello... Tink, Pepys, tink. Bills to pay. I gotta have the Port of London. You wouldn't want me not to have the Port of London, right, Pepys? Would ya? Would ya?" Grim look.

"No, of course not, Biff. You'll be getting the Port victualing."

"That's what I like to hear, Pepys. Ooops, look, it's a rat." Knocks wig off Sam's head again. "Nope, just your wig. You're so gullable, Pepys."

Eyes a grimly staring Hayter next to Sam... "So, what's with you, butt-head Quaker boy? See ya later, Pepys...Say hi to your wife for me." leering sneer...

"All right, bye, Biff..." Sam waves.

"Sir..." Hayter, glaring after Wilson... "Why the devil...Lord forgive me such a word...Do you allow that oaf such liberties?"

"Hayter, 'tis a minor thing." Sam shrugs with offhand wave.

"But you're the COA of the King's Navy and now the Surveyor General. With your responsibilities you needn't tolerate such nonsense from a blockheaded fool."

"Indeed. And as such, in these times, in need of an utterly blockheaded fall guy. Mr. Povy sadly having had the good sense to retire from such business." shrewd look...

Ohhhh...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"He tells me also that the Parliament hath given the Duke of Yorke 120,000l., to be paid him after the 1,250,000l. is gathered upon the tax which they have now given the King"

Duke of Yorke's Revenue.

A Bill for granting the Sum of One hundred and twenty thousand Nine-hundred and Two Pounds Fifteen Shillings Eight-pence to his Majesty, to be, if it shall please his Majesty, bestowed on his Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke, was read the Second time.

Resolved, &c. That the House do forthwith resolve into a Committee of the whole House, to proceed in the Consideration of the said Bill.

And accordingly the House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House.

Mr. Speaker left the Chair: And

Sir Edward Thurland took the Chair of the Committee.

Mr. Speaker took the Chair again.

Sir Edward Thurland reports, That the Committee had agreed the Sums for filling up the Blanks in the Bill; and had passed through the other Parts of the Bill; and agreed it: And read the Amendments in his Place; and after, delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table: Which Amendments being twice read, were, upon the Question, severally agreed to.

And some other Amendments being, upon the Question, agreed, and made;

Resolved, &c. That the Bill, with the Amendments agreed to, be ingrossed. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Australian Susan   Link to this

"....The King and Court, they say, have now finally resolved to spend nothing upon clothes, but what is of the growth of England; which, if observed, will be very pleasing to the people, and very good for them....."

Oh, dear, oh dear. Sam now has to explain to Bess that she can't have new silk gowns, but must have plain woolen or linen as is now the Court custom. [and will be much cheaper..No, Bess, I didn't say that! Ow!]

Mary   Link to this

"but what is of the growth of England"

It ain't never going to work. The fashionable and upwardly mobile will always manage to wear exactly what they wish to wear, but they may have to pay a higher price on the Black Market for their luxury goods if parliament ever gets as far as legislating in the matter.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Admiral Sir Will Penn can't be too happy with the King's new economic stimulus package...Didn't he just invest a load in prize goods silk?

Don McCahill   Link to this

Maybe I missed something here, but what is the Duke getting so much money for? Has he spent his own money on ships and war materiel? Is he expected to use this money for the navy?

jeannine   Link to this

“….The King and Court, they say, have now finally resolved to spend nothing upon clothes, but what is of the growth of England; which, if observed, will be very pleasing to the people, and very good for them…..”

This shouldn't matter much at all--in this "Libertine Court" of King Charles most of the courtiers don't seem to keep their clothes on anyway!

JWB   Link to this

Jamie to be de-tasselated?

http://www.kipar.org/period-galleries/paintings...

And I thought that statue of Washington seated in Roman dress was embarassing.

jeannine   Link to this

Jamie to be de-tasselated?

http://www.kipar.org/period-galleries/paintings...

And I thought that statue of Washington seated in Roman dress was embarassing.

JWB--In today's world this would probably go into the category of what NOT to post on your Facebook page......

Rex Gordon   Link to this

Australian Susan -

I tried to e-mail you directly about yesterday's Stow annotation, but the Mailer Daemon rejected it. Please e-mail me at rgordon@oag.state.md.us if you want.

LSL   Link to this

Unlurking for a minute - Has anyone heard from cgs? I miss reading the thoughts of a euphemistic pirate.
...Which is similar to Pepys missing Povy or Mennes.

Mary   Link to this

cgs last posted on 11th October, I believe. On holiday?

jeannine   Link to this

Unlurking for a minute - Has anyone heard from cgs? I miss reading the thoughts of a euphemistic pirate.

I sent him an email so I'll let you know if/what I hear back.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Today in the HofCommons, the secretary of the admiralty has been at work.

Relief of Seamen.

Ordered, That his Majesty be humbly desired, That he would be pleased to issue out a new Commission to inquire after, and take a speedy Account of, the Chest Money allotted for Relief of sick and maimed Seamen; and the Arrears thereof, or of any Lands that have been purchased or given for that charitable Use. And Sir William Coventry, Sir Francis Clarke, and Mr. Pryn, are to attend his Majesty with this Address. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Will this request for a new Chatham Chest commission prompt Pepys's own investigation? Stay tuned....

cgs   Link to this

money, money, money everywhere but not a farthing for the tar.
Bale out of the kings navy, King has to be persuaded that not a drop of taxable monies like the mail monies will be spent on the boudoir,no bonuses for the great court before paying of the stock holders [ Sorry the navy] and the indebted ones.

Bedroom and bonuses before k401's and ships, or am I confused which year this be, 2008 down at the coffee shop, no this be 1665 year of the plague not the the year of the recession.
Oh! well Samuel Peep's ghost must be chuckling, go get more funds, which ones, poppies or hemp, before the Coldstream guards be needed.

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