Tuesday 24 October 1665

Lay long, having a cold. Then to my Lord and sent him going to Oxford, and I to my office, whither comes Sir William Batten now newly from Oxford. I can gather nothing from him about my Lord Sandwich about the business of the prizes, he being close, but he shewed me a bill which hath been read in the House making all breaking of bulke for the time to come felony, but it is a foolish Act, and will do no great matter, only is calculated to my Lord Sandwich’s case. He shewed me also a good letter printed from the Bishopp of Munster to the States of Holland shewing the state of their case. Here we did some business and so broke up and I to Cocke, where Mr. Evelyn was, to dinner, and there merry, yet vexed again at publique matters, and to see how little heed is had to the prisoners and sicke and wounded. Thence to my office, and no sooner there but to my great surprise am told that my Lord Sandwich is come to towne; so I presently to Boreman’s, where he is and there found him: he mighty kind to me, but no opportunity of discourse private yet, which he tells me he must have with me; only his business is sudden to go to the fleece, to get out a few ships to drive away the Dutch. I left him in discourse with Sir W. Batten and others, and myself to the office till about 10 at night and so, letters being done, I to him again to Captain Cocke’s, where he supped, and lies, and never saw him more merry, and here is Charles Herbert, who the King hath lately knighted. My Lord, to my great content, did tell me before them, that never anything was read to the King and Council, all the chief Ministers of State being there, as my letter about the Victualling was, and no more said upon it than a most thorough consent to every word was said, and directed, that it be pursued and practised. After much mirth, and my Lord having travelled all night last night, he to bed, and we all parted, I home.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a bill which hath been read in the House making all breaking of bulke for the time to come felony"

In the House of Commons last Friday, 21 October, 1665.

Prize Goods.

A Bill to prevent the Imbezzling of Prize Goods * * * *.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill be committed to Mr. Milward, Sir Jonath. Trelawny, Sir Hen. North, Sir Abraham Cullen, Lord Gorge, Mr. Yorke, Mr. Seymour, Sir Jo. Talbot, Colonel Wyndham, Colonel Reames, Mr. Jolliff, Sir Tho. Gower, Sir Rob. Atkins, Colonel Strangewayes, Mr. Chowne, Mr. Crouch, Sir Ralph Bancks, Mr. Garway, Sir Chichester Wray, Mr. Trevor, Mr. Coleman, Mr. Hyde, Mr. Crooke, Mr. Scowen, Sir Jo. Goodrick, Sir Job Charleton, Mr. Ashburnham, Sir Edm. Pooley, Sir Lan. Lake, Sir Jo. Knight, Mr. Pryn, Mr. Dowdeswell, Sir Phil. Warwick, Sir Jo. Heath, Lord Richardson, Mr. Phillips, Lord Fitzharding, Mr. Denny, Sir Jo. Duncombe, Sir Winst. Churchill, Mr. Newport, Mr. Serjeant Seys, Sir Rob. Carr, Mr. Forde, Mr. Wyndham: And they are to meet at Two of the Clock this Afternoon, in the Moral Philosophy School: And to send for Persons, Papers, and Records. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

L&M say this Bill was never heard of after this; and that it was committed on the 23rd.

Martin   Link to this

"to go to the fleece"
This should read "to go to the fleete".

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... and I to Cocke, where Mr. Evelyn was, to dinner, and there merry, yet vexed again at publique matters, and to see how little heed is had to the prisoners and sicke and wounded."

Had passed me by that Cocke is also 'Treasurer of the Commission for Sick and Wounded Seaman.' (see Pauline's annotation, http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/3164/ )

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... a good letter printed from the Bishopp of Munster to the States of Holland shewing the state of their case. "

Bernhard, Prince-Bishop of Münster, 1606-1678.
A letter sent by His Highness the Bishop & Prince of Munster to the Lords the States General of the United Netherlands.
Printed by command for F.B. Esquire, At Oxford : by William Hall, and are to be sold by Thomas Bowman, M.DC.LXV. [1665]
[2], 13, [1] p. ; 4⁰. Wing (CD-ROM, 1996), G163

the London edition:
A letter sent by His Highness the Bishop and Prince of Munster, to the Lords the States-General of the United Netherlands; discovering their wicked designs and abominable actions; the cause of the present war and military undertakings; as the rising of the noble-mens houses, the plundering of the commons, the torturing of their bodies in a most cruel and barbarous manner, the roasting them alive at the fire, and like Turks or infidels, to rob and abuse the sacred churches.
[Variant title: Letter sent by his Highness the Bishop and Prince of Munster, to the Lords the States-General of the United Netherlands, our friendly service, and whatsoever else of love and kindness is in our power, high and mighty Lords, our singularly beloved friends and neighbours]
[London] : By the original, printed by command for F. B. Esquire, M.DC.LXV. [1665]
[2], 5, [1] p. ; 4⁰. Place of publication from Wing CD-ROM, 1996, G164
P. 5 ends: "Given at St. Loutgersburg the 14 of September, Anno 1665." signed: "Christopher Bernard.".

Pepys had noted Blackwell going abroad, in July, in fact to make payment to Bernard von Galen to secure his invasion of the Netherlands by land:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/06/
and inaccurate rumors of Blackwell's location:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/22/#c22...
News reports of Dutch fears of Bernard's invasion and intervention:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/27/#c22...

JWB   Link to this

Bishop of Munster

A later Galen & Bishop of Munster, had his sermons dropped by allied bombers onto heads of Germans WWII.

JWB   Link to this

For those interested in the latter-day Bishop goto: http://www.churchinhistory.org/pages/booklets/v...

The "Hammer & Anvil" sermon is justly famous. "Become hard, remain firm".

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"to the fleece..."

Sam's Freudian slip...?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"going to Oxford"

I.e. going to where the Court now is, fleeing the plague.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

to the fleet/ce

I don't know if Robert intends to be serious, but the slip was clearly on the part of Gutenberg's scanner.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

But my interpretation is so much more fun...

tld   Link to this

"Lay long, having a cold."

Hey, that's the first time I've seen Sam say he had a simple cold. Does OED note this, or is there earlier use?

He's had a variety of other hurts. I assume he's had other colds. It's like he never just admits he has a simple cold.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

OED's first citation for "cold" in this sense is from 1537. Sam doesn't get a mention this time.

4.b. An inflammatory condition of the mucous membrane of the respiratory organs, accompanied by catarrh, hoarseness, and cough. Hence, to catch, get or take (a) cold, have a cold, etc.

1537 State Papers Hen. VIII, iv. (1836) 91 If I take any cold, incontinent the lax commythe agayne. 1597 Shakes. 2 Hen. IV, iii. ii. 193. 1609 B. Jonson Sil. Woman iii. i, One that has catched a cold, sir, and can scarce be heard six inches off. 1679 Lond. Gaz. No. 1436/4 His Majesty+has been indisposed for some days by a Cold he took. 1747 Wesley Prim. Physic (1762) Introd. 22 Obstructed Perspiration (vulgarly called catching Cold) is one great source of Diseases. 1751 Johnson Rambler No. 154 319 All whom I entreat to sing are troubled with colds. 1751 Eliza Heywood Betsy Thoughtless IV. 287 Lady Loveit, having got a cold, had complained of some little disorder. 1871 Sir T. Watson Princ. & Pract. Physic (ed. 5) II. 55 Suffering under what is popularly called ‘a crying cold’. 1872 W. Aitken Sc. & Pract. Med. (ed. 6) II. 725 The symptoms of ‘a common cold’. 1886 Morley Crit. Misc. III. 17 The people of+St. Kilda believed that the arrival of a ship in the harbour inflicted on the islanders epidemic colds in the head.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.