Wednesday 20 September 1665

Called up by Captain Cocke (who was last night put into great trouble upon his boy’s being rather worse than better, upon which he removed him out of his house to his stable), who told me that to my comfort his boy was now as well as ever he was in his life. So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, and more, went to Sir J. Minnes’s, where I find all out of order still, they having not seen one another till by and by Sir J. Minnes and Sir W. Batten met, to go into my Lord Bruncker’s coach, and so we four to Lambeth, and thence to the Duke of Albemarle, to inform him what we have done as to the fleete, which is very little, and to receive his direction. But, Lord! what a sad time it is to see no boats upon the River; and grass grows all up and down White Hall court, and nobody but poor wretches in the streets! And, which is worst of all, the Duke showed us the number of the plague this week, brought in the last night from the Lord Mayor; that it is encreased about 600 more than the last, which is quite contrary to all our hopes and expectations, from the coldness of the late season. For the whole general number is 8,297, and of them the plague 7,165; which is more in the whole by above 50, than the biggest Bill yet; which is very grievous to us all. I find here a design in my Lord Bruncker and Captain Cocke to have had my Lord Bruncker chosen as one of us to have been sent aboard one of the East Indiamen, and Captain Cocke as a merchant to be joined with him, and Sir J. Minnes for the other, and Sir G. Smith to be joined with him. But I did order it so that my Lord Bruncker and Sir J. Minnes were ordered, but I did stop the merchants to be added, which would have been a most pernicious thing to the King I am sure. In this I did, I think, a very good office, though I cannot acquit myself from some envy of mine in the business to have the profitable business done by another hand while I lay wholly imployed in the trouble of the office. Thence back again by my Lord’s coach to my Lord Bruncker’s house, where I find my Lady Batten, who is become very great with Mrs. Williams (my Lord Bruncker’s whore), and there we dined and were mighty merry. After dinner I to the office there to write letters, to fit myself for a journey to-morrow to Nonsuch to the Exchequer by appointment. That being done I to Sir J. Minnes where I find Sir W. Batten and his Lady gone home to Walthamstow in great snuffe as to Sir J. Minnes, but yet with some necessity, hearing that a mayde- servant of theirs is taken ill. Here I staid and resolved of my going in my Lord Bruncker’s coach which he would have me to take, though himself cannot go with me as he intended, and so to my last night’s lodging to bed very weary.

15 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Called up by Captain Cocke..., who told me that to my comfort his boy was now as well as ever he was in his life."

That's why he "...was last night put into great trouble upon his boy’s being rather worse than better, upon which he removed him out of his house to his stable"

The boy's health is unstable, Captain Cocke; leave him without!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... but I did stop the merchants to be added, which would have been a most pernicious thing to the King I am sure. In this I did, I think, a very good office, though I cannot acquit myself from some envy of mine in the business to have the profitable business done by another hand while I lay wholly imployed in the trouble of the office."

Wonderful sequence of Pepysian rationalization; now if only all involved had agreed to give SP a percentage of the business up front, would that not have been expeditious in raising money fast, rather than 'pernicious,' for the King!

Poor SP, too busy securing his continuing personal interest in Tangier matters, allows Minnes, the "doating foole, to do no good, but proclaim himself an asse; ...," to beat him out in the race to the real financial action.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/09/16/

CGS   Link to this

"...So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths,..."
Wot be under the periwig be Samuel's and that that be outside be cut for a new periwig.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, ..."

CGS: I just assumed the barber had a pretty young assistant, like Jane Welsh ...
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/7853/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys." a solemn, sad-eyed Captain Cocke.

"Cocke? You look...Has the boy...?"

"No, no...Jacke's quite well. But...I'm afraid the barber just died."

CGS   Link to this

Thanks M.R.: searching the diurnal for barber,allowed me to see that his visits in the past year, be only to snuf out the terrain, not to shear locks.
I only visit the shearers every 3 to 4 months, that creates enough comments, but for a young man, that growth must must have been wondrous, no wonder he periwigged it.
Of course having long tresses, would be a grand excuse to have a young lass debug him, while he was using his immense imagination on that that lay within eyeball reach.

tg   Link to this

"So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, and more."

This again raises the hygiene issue of 17th century life. Sam seems to only infrequently "shift himself" of his clothes, and now he tells us he hasn't shaved for a year. Is it any wonder they can't figure out what is causing the plague? At least the ancients knew that hot and cold running water was vital to healthy life.

Ruben   Link to this

“…So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths,…”

From Pepys portrait we cannot know if Pepys was bald or not. Many males have hair growing on the sides and are completely bald in the same place were our Samuel likes to have his wig. If the wig was the same colour of his hair, he did not need to trim, specially considering that locks were OK in his time.

Mary   Link to this

'trimming' does not necessarily involve shaving.

In February 1664 Sam was certainly shaving himself in the mornings (though not necessarily every morning), so perhaps he has just continued this practice without recording it in the diary. He may have been growing and wearing his own hair for a year, but I find it difficult to imagine that he would have been allowing his beard to grow for twelve whole months without making some mention of that fact in the journal.

tonyt   Link to this

'I did stop the merchants to be added'. You would think that Brouncker and Minnes might have been rather upset with Pepys over this action but there is no evidence for it in the rest of this diary entry.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Probably Brouncker and Minnes only offered requests spots for Cocke and (presumably) Sir G. Smith as favors...I imagine their only concern really is that they get on board.

JWB   Link to this

Not bald in August:

"Dressed and had my head combed by my little girle,..."

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"...touched by a barber these twelve months."
Methinks he has been shaving himself;our Sam is too fashion conscious.

CGS   Link to this

Surely barber be not only for the sideburns and chin stubble, they had flints for eons to scrape off the excess facial growth, even most thinning hair types have hair growth else where on the major sensing block, see the images of the great Bard and not all be tonsured.
Most of the Citezens could not come up with the enough farthings to sit and discuss the the weather while be sheared and peeled.

Sensing block, where the audio gets transcribed, visuals get down loaded, where the dead life gets re-organised and tasted and finally results get transcribed into sound.

dirk   Link to this

From the Carte Papers, Bodleian Library
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

James, Duke of York, to Sandwich

Written from: York
Date: 1665 [possibly 18 September?]

Expresses H.R.H.'s satisfaction at the receipt of the despatches brought by Sir Henry Bellasis, reporting the late action with part of the Dutch fleet. What hath been done, "considering with how little loss it hath been acquired is sufficient ground to give God thanks for his goodness to us, and, under him to you for your care in this action". Adds that as to Lord Sandwich's going onshore he willingly concurs in the directions which his Lordship will receive from the King at Salisbury. ...

-----

George, Duke of Albemarle, to Sandwich

Written from: Cock-pitt
Date: 19 September 1665

Has received his Lordship's letter of the 16th instant. Trusts he will take care that there be no embezzlement of Prize Goods, for, adds the Duke, "I cannot tell what shifts we shall make for moneys, unless we make something out of these Prizes that may be considerable; and if there be an account taken of them, and put into the East-India Company's hands, I believe they will advance a good sum of money to pay off the fleet, and to help us towards the payment of the prisoners and sick men". Communicates his opinion as to the sending of convoys for merchant ships bound to the Elbe & elsewhere. Enters, at great length, into questions affecting the disposal of prisoners:- "For Chelsea College, Mr Evelyn told me... that not more Dutch prisoners than 250 or 300... can be received there".

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