Monday 21 August 1665

Called up, by message from Lord Bruncker and the rest of my fellows, that they will meet me at the Duke of Albemarle’s this morning; so I up, and weary, however, got thither before them, and spoke with my Lord, and with him and other gentlemen to walk in the Parke, where, I perceive, he spends much of his time, having no whither else to go; and here I hear him speake of some Presbyter people that he caused to be apprehended yesterday, at a private meeting in Covent Garden, which he would have released upon paying 5l. per man to the poor, but it was answered, they would not pay anything; so he ordered them to another prison from the guard. By and by comes my fellow-officers, and the Duke walked in, and to counsel with us; and that being done we departed, and Sir W. Batten and I to the office, where, after I had done a little business, I to his house to dinner, whither comes Captain Cocke, for whose epicurisme a dish of partriges was sent for, and still gives me reason to think is the greatest epicure in the world. Thence, after dinner, I by water to Sir W. Warren’s and with him two hours, talking of things to his and my profit, and particularly good advice from him what use to make of Sir G. Carteret’s kindnesse to me and my interest in him, with exceeding good cautions for me not using it too much nor obliging him to fear by prying into his secrets, which it were easy for me to do. Thence to my Lord Bruncker, at Greenwich, and Sir J. Minnes by appointment, to looke after the lodgings appointed for us there for our office, which do by no means please me, they being in the heart of all the labourers and workmen there, which makes it as unsafe as to be, I think, at London. Mr. Hugh May, who is a most ingenuous man, did show us the lodgings, and his acquaintance I am desirous of. Thence walked, it being now dark, to Sir J. Minnes’s, and there staid at the door talking with him an hour while messengers went to get a boat for me, to carry me to Woolwich, but all to no purpose; so I was forced to walk it in the darke, at ten o’clock at night, with Sir J. Minnes’s George with me, being mightily troubled for fear of the doggs at Coome farme, and more for fear of rogues by the way, and yet more because of the plague which is there, which is very strange, it being a single house, all alone from the towne, but it seems they use to admit beggars, for their owne safety, to lie in their barns, and they brought it to them; but I bless God I got about eleven of the clock well to my wife, and giving 4s. in recompence to George, I to my wife, and having first viewed her last piece of drawing since I saw her, which is seven or eight days, which pleases me beyond any thing in the world, to bed with great content but weary.

24 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Some L&M notes about terrain

"from the guard" = from the guard-house at Whitehall.

"Sir W. Warren's" = at Rotherhithe

"labourers and workmen there" = those who were rebuilding Greenwich Palace.

"Coome farme" = "Probably in the marshes east of the palace....There were several combes in this distrct."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

combe:
a deep narrow valley; a valley on the flank of a hill; from the Old English cumb
http://pages.sbcglobal.net/netwits/Adventure/ht...

cgs   Link to this

Coome farm on the road to Wool[w]ich from 'Grenich' before yee get to hanging wood [see Motco at Woolwich]

cgs   Link to this

"...a dish of partriges ..." I wonder how many braces there were in the pie, I wonder if Samuel ever saw a covey. A luverly dish, better than Cornish hen.

cgs   Link to this

"...the rest of my fellows..." anybody have the list of lads?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... what use to make of Sir G. Carteret’s kindnesse to me and my interest in him, ..."

Appears that none of SP's relationships are financially, or otherwise, disinterested.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... so I up, and weary ..."

Given the distance SP rode yesterday and prior, am surprised that someone who does not spend time on horseback every day can walk comfortably at all.

tg   Link to this

"So I was forced to walk it in the darke, at ten o’clock at night, with Sir J. Minnes’s George with me" Luckily no moon direction problems tonight.

"being mightily troubled for fear of the doggs at Coome farme, and more for fear of rogues by the way, and yet more because of the plague which is there." A triple threat to walking at night, the dogs, the rogues and the plague. It's a jungle out there.

Eric Walla   Link to this

And George gets 4s. Does he also get a place to spend the night, or is it the long trek back for George?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“…the rest of my fellows…”

SP says "Called up, by message from Lord Bruncker and the rest of my fellows, that they will meet me at the Duke of Albemarle’s this morning" and "By and by comes my fellow-officers," -- so, might we assume the Navy Officers are his "fellows" -- 'tis not a stretch; then a Navy Board meet with the Lord High Admiral in wartime -- "and the Duke walked in, and to counsel with us; and that being done we departed"

Ruben   Link to this

"with Sir J. Minnes’s George with me”
Such a possessive way of refering to George... is it possible he refers to an African slave?

Mary   Link to this

Well, it's possible but by no means necessary. Will Hewer could just as easily be referred to as 'Pepys's Will" and he's no slave, African or otherwise.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...where, I perceive, he spends much of his time, having no whither else to go..." Plague constraints or a wry comment on Bruncker's general ineffectiveness?

Seems rather petty of idle milord to fill his time harassing the poor Presbyterians so.

***

"...obliging him to fear by prying into his secrets..." Carteret did seem a mite too talkative the other day with that speech about always being on the receiving end of anything Charles gets his hands on. Wonder if Warren is quietly hinting that he and George have a few deals that should be kept mum should Carteret let his tongue slip.

Mary   Link to this

harassing the poor Presbyterians.

The combination of the plague and the Dutch war made the court and government particularly anxious about the activities of dissidents and supposed plotters at this time. There was a lively fear of sedition, so this particular instance can't really be described as petty oppression.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

“with Sir J. Minnes’s George with me”

Would have been ordinary usage in non-metropolitan England in the third quarter of the C 20th. to characterize a particular factotum, from personal knowledge; but very probably too far from pc now to be used in other than private conversation.

JWB   Link to this

Escher's world

A combe in a marsh?

JWB   Link to this

Presbyter people:

"...but now when the ministers in the city-churches fled, and left their flocks in the time of their extremity, several of them pitying the dying and distressed people, who had noone to help them to prepare for another world, nor to comfort them in thier terrors,...were convinced that no obedience to the laws of man could justify their neglecting men's souls and bodies...Therefore they resolved to stay with them, enter the foresaken pulpits...The persons...Mr.T.Vincent,Chester,Janeway,Turner,Grimes,Franklyn & others."

"The Nonconformist's Memorial",E. Calamy & S. Palmer, p55-6

http://books.google.com/books?id=ZocAAAAAMAAJ&p...

dirk   Link to this

From the Carte Papers, Bodleian Library
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Lady Sandwich to Lord Sandwich

Written from: [Apparently from Hinchinbroke]
Date: 21 August 1665

After mention of many domestic affairs, notices the improvements made in the house and gardens, and finds them "very handsome much beyond what I could expect... There is every day company in the bowling-alley of the better sort of our neighbours".

Rex Gordon   Link to this

"They used to admit beggars, for their owne safety, to lie in their barns ... "

This reminds me of people in New York and other large American cities who tolerate a homeless man sleeping in their street-parked automobile overnight. His presence deters thieves. I've read an account of one such relationship where the car owner, realizing that someone was sleeping in the car overnight, left a pillow and blanket for him. The blanket was neatly folded, the pillow on top of it, in the morning. One of my witnesses in a murder trial in the 1990s was living this way in Baltimore.

JWB   Link to this

Mary:"...so this particular instance can’t really be described as petty oppression."

Just storing up the grapes of wrath.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I don't know...Bruncker's action following on Sam's description of his idleness seems a little like an seat-holder looking for something to do. Sam's tone seems to me mildly disapproving of a man he once thought tolerably well of.

Pedro   Link to this

On this day Sandwich writes...

Wind East. We weighed and came to anchor in Southwold Bay at 5 o'clock in the afternoon. Thence I wrote to the Duke of Albemarle to Whitehall for men and provisions, and to Mr Pepys.

Paul Dyson   Link to this

“They used to admit beggars, for their owne safety, to lie in their barns … “

In "The Lady in the Van" (1990), published both as a work of prose and as a play, Alan Bennett tells the story of Miss Shepherd, an elderly homeless woman who lived in his driveway for 15 years.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"they used to admit beggars"
It might have changed quite a lot in New York because quite recently one particular church had to go to Court to keep the police from rounding up the beggars that were sleeping in her stairway.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.