Tuesday 11 July 1665

And so all night down by water, a most pleasant passage, and come thither by two o’clock, and so walked from the Old Swan home, and there to bed to my Will, being very weary, and he lodging at my desire in my house. At 6 o’clock up and to Westminster (where and all the towne besides, I hear, the plague encreases), and, it being too soon to go to the Duke of Albemarle, I to the Harp and Ball, and there made a bargain with Mary to go forth with me in the afternoon, which she with much ado consented to. So I to the Duke of Albemarle’s, and there with much ado did get his consent in part to my having the money promised for Tangier, and the other part did not concur. So being displeased with this, I back to the office and there sat alone a while doing business, and then by a solemn invitation to the Trinity House, where a great dinner and company, Captain Dobbin’s feast for Elder Brother. But I broke up before the dinner half over and by water to the Harp and Ball, and thence had Mary meet me at the New Exchange, and there took coach and I with great pleasure took the ayre to Highgate, and thence to Hampstead, much pleased with her company, pretty and innocent, and had what pleasure almost I would with her, and so at night, weary and sweaty, it being very hot beyond bearing, we back again, and I set her down in St. Martin’s Lane, and so I to the evening ‘Change, and there hear all the towne full that Ostend is delivered to us, and that Alderman Backewell1 did go with 50,000l. to that purpose. But the truth of it I do not know, but something I believe there is extraordinary in his going. So to the office, where I did what I could as to letters, and so away to bed, shifting myself, and taking some Venice treakle, feeling myself out of order, and thence to bed to sleep.


9 Annotations

Andrew Hamilton  •  Link

And so all night down by water, a most pleasant passage, and come thither by two o’clock,

So Sam didn't stay at Mortlake. He found a waterman to bring him home.
Any idea how the Duke of A. could in part support Sam's claim for Tangier funds and yet "the other part did not concur" ?

Bradford  •  Link

"Venice treakle"---Italian molasses? Another physic? Or the 16thC version of Geritol for "iron poor blood"?

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Mary...

"...had what pleasure almost I would with her..." Considering his description of Mary as innocent, I suspect he got a kiss or two, a hug and no more...

Albemarle...

"...did get his consent in part to my having the money promised for Tangier, and the other part did not concur. So being displeased with this..." I'd guess that meant the Duke was all for Tangier seeing the money when the King should be in funds but just right now...Unless Council and King should happen to have some money...

Ergo...Much ado about nothing...
***

Venice treacle...

If it's possibly good against venom, maybe it's good against other things. Hey, this is the man who happily swallows turpentine pills.

***

I wonder if Tom Edwards or Will Hewer were forced to be in some attendance during all or part of Sam's little rendezvous. I would imagine Sam required at least someone near at hand to run errands/carry messages at all times.

Say, maybe it being Charles' court there was some unspoken (or spoken)requirement that every administrator be known to be successful with the ladies.

One year ago...

"Pepys?"

"Your Grace?"

"I've been meaning to speak to you for sometime now, Pepys about your off-duty activities."

"Your Grace...? I...My off-duty...Your Grace, I assure you. Any rumours coming to you..."

"The thing is Pepys. There are no rumours. None. Everyone knows you as Mr. Diligent and an upstanding husband. The King is a bit perturbed, Pepys. We don't want to lose your service but..."

"'But'?...Your Grace?"

"You're making us all look bad, Sam. The contrast...Plus my brother likes to know the men around him aren't all sober, dour, nose-to-the-grindstone types...Especially those not with him during the recent troubled times. Reminds him of the Puritan ministers, you see. Anyway, Pepys, you need to get yourself a girl."

"Sir?"

"A girl, Pepys...Preferably a pretty mistress but if you prefer nothing so established at least some pretty young thing seen around town with you. I can furnish a list should you need one? Nice girls, very discreet. Now, Samuel...Don't look so gloomy. It does have to be anything serious...Just a little light flirtation...With some sweet girl who looks good on your shoulder. Think of it as another little matter of office/Court protocol. A patriotic duty, really. After all, We don't want Louis' court winning the mistress gap, do we?"

"Well...If Your Grace puts it that way..."

Linda F  •  Link

While there is a suggestion here that Albemarle was in two minds about the issue, his concurrence "in part" suggests that he agreed to Sam's having only a part, but not all, of the funds alloted for Tangier.

Linda F  •  Link

While there is a suggestion here that Albemarle was of two minds about the issue, his concurrence "in part" suggests that he agreed to Sam's having only a part, but not all, of the funds alloted for Tangier.

Pedro  •  Link

“and thence to Hampstead, much pleased with her company, pretty and innocent, and had what pleasure almost I would with her,”

Hampstead Heath is still a popular place, so they tell me!

Andrew Hamilton  •  Link

"the mistress gap"

Love it!

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Poster of Charles, eyes focused on, forefinger pointed at...You, Lady Castlemaine on his shoulder. "England expects every Courtier to do His Duty. Close the Mistress Gap!" Portrait of angry Louis in right corner, frustrated look at sheephish French courtier with no girl on arm.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"So I to the Duke of Albemarle’s, and there with much ado did get his consent in part to my having the money promised for Tangier, and the other part did not concur. "

L&M say "It was a question of allocating certain excise revenue; Albemarle still claimed some for the army."

Ah, yes: as commander-in-chief Albemarle does have other responsibilities, and he is still George Monck (former General of the New Model Army).

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