Monday 2 January 1664/65

Up, and it being a most fine, hard frost I walked a good way toward White Hall, and then being overtaken with Sir W. Pen’s coach, went into it, and with him thither, and there did our usual business with the Duke. Thence, being forced to pay a great deale of money away in boxes (that is, basins at White Hall), I to my barber’s, Gervas, and there had a little opportunity of speaking with my Jane alone, and did give her something, and of herself she did tell me a place where I might come to her on Sunday next, which I will not fail, but to see how modestly and harmlessly she brought it out was very pretty. Thence to the Swan, and there did sport a good while with Herbert’s young kinswoman without hurt, though they being abroad, the old people. Then to the Hall, and there agreed with Mrs. Martin, and to her lodgings which she has now taken to lie in, in Bow Streete, pitiful poor things, yet she thinks them pretty, and so they are for her condition I believe good enough. Here I did ‘ce que je voudrais avec’ her most freely, and it having cost 2s. in wine and cake upon her, I away sick of her impudence, and by coach to my Lord Brunker’s, by appointment, in the Piazza, in Covent-Guarding; where I occasioned much mirth with a ballet I brought with me, made from the seamen at sea to their ladies in town; saying Sir W. Pen, Sir G. Ascue, and Sir J. Lawson made them. Here a most noble French dinner and banquet, the best I have seen this many a day and good discourse. Thence to my bookseller’s and at his binder’s saw Hooke’s book of the Microscope, which is so pretty that I presently bespoke it, and away home to the office, where we met to do something, and then though very late by coach to Sir Ph. Warwicke’s, but having company with him could not speak with him. So back again home, where thinking to be merry was vexed with my wife’s having looked out a letter in Sir Philip Sidney about jealousy for me to read, which she industriously and maliciously caused me to do, and the truth is my conscience told me it was most proper for me, and therefore was touched at it, but tooke no notice of it, but read it out most frankly, but it stucke in my stomach, and moreover I was vexed to have a dog brought to my house to line our little bitch, which they make him do in all their sights, which, God forgive me, do stir my jealousy again, though of itself the thing is a very immodest sight. However, to cards with my wife a good while, and then to bed.

33 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

I to my barber's, Gervas, and there had a little opportunity of speaking with my Jane alone, and did give her something, and of herself she did tell me a place where I might come to her on Sunday next,

Gervas to Pepys... "Something for the weekend Sir?"

Pedro   Link to this

"Thence to my bookseller’s and at his binder’s saw Hooke’s book of the Microscope, which is so pretty that I presently bespoke it,"

The book also included a number of original theories concerning the nature of light, and Robert Hooke the arch enemy of Sir Isaac, would later say that Newton had taken inspiration from this book to demonstrate an opposing theory of light.

(Isaac Newton, The Last Sourcerer by Michael White)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a ballet I brought with me, made from the seamen at sea to their ladies in town"

L&M identify this ballad as "To all you ladies now at land", written not by Sirs W. Pen, G. Ascue, and J. Lawson but by Lord Buckhurst (later Earl of Dorset).

Pedro   Link to this

"but by Lord Buckhurst (later Earl of Dorset)."

Thomas Sackville, earl of Dorset (1536-1608)

For a long poem by himself, The Mirror for Magistrates: The Induction…

http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poem/1786.html

Pedro   Link to this

Perhaps someone can come up with this ballad?

There is “ The Pepys Ballads” by LEBA M. GOLDSTEIN, Sackville ballad mentioned in the Diary entry for 2 January 1665 ... mentioned on

http://library.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/c...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M note that a sheet of one, "now untraced, was entered into the Stationers' Register, 30 December 1664, entitled 'The Noble seamans complaint to the Ladies at London, to the tune of Shackerley Hay".

Michael Robinson   Link to this

“To all you ladies now at land”,

Song, Written at Sea, in the First Dutch War (1665),
the night before an Engagement.

TO all you ladies now at land
We men at sea indite;
But first would have you understand
How hard it is to write:
The Muses now, and Neptune too,
We must implore to write to you—
With a fa, la, la, la, la.

For though the Muses should prove kind,
And fill our empty brain,
Yet if rough Neptune rouse the wind
To wave the azure main,
Our paper, pen, and ink, and we,
Roll up and down our ships at sea—
With a fa, la, la, la, la.

and more stanzas similar:-
http://www.bartleby.com/101/408.html
Text from 'The Oxford Book of English Verse,' 1919 edn.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Sir Philip Sydney? Very impressive, Bess...A very shrewd choice, sure to appeal to your boy.

Interesting the harping on jealousy...Bess seems to have no conception that her woes lie in another direction.

***
I don't get...And am not sure I want to...The jealousy of the poor dog.

What, is he getting more than you these days, Sam?

***
Well, at least he finally found the time and good grace to entertain Bess at cards a bit. Lets hope Jane sticks it to him yet again...

"Oh, sir. I truly did mean to keep our appointment...But me dog was in heat and I..."

Damn dogs...

cape henry   Link to this

"...about jealousy..." Elizabeth was evidently attempting to make a point by using a letter in a book.
Sam, however, being the blameless character that he is all around, pretends it is of little connection to him. He then moves on to the mating of the dog, "...the thing is a very immodest sight." Something we might say to him on this day.

language hat   Link to this

"there had a little opportunity of speaking with my Jane alone, and did give her something, and of herself she did tell me a place where I might come to her on Sunday next, which I will not fail...
Thence to the Swan, and there did sport a good while with Herbert’s young kinswoman without hurt...
Then to the Hall, and there agreed with Mrs. Martin... Here I did ‘ce que je voudrais avec’ her most freely, and it having cost 2s. in wine and cake upon her, I away sick of her impudence"

Talk about impudence!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... a letter in Sir Philip Sidney about jealousy ..."

L&M note "In the third Eclogue of the third book of the Arcadia ("a Jealous husband made a pander to his own wife) ..."

[I failed to find the quite in a seach of the entire text of Book III in the 1590 edition ( http://www.uoregon.edu/~rbear/arcadia3.html ) ; I assume it must be from a text based upon the edition of 1593]

Michael L   Link to this

The comment last week that Bess is of much less importance in Sam's sight seems increasingly true. He clearly does not need to rely on her for sex any more, and she comes across in the diary more as a nuisance than a mate.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

How ironic that Elizabeth leaves a letter from Sir Philip about a husband's jealousy -- thus chiding Sam for the sin of his jealousy regarding her -- on a day when *he's* been playing the dog so freely and she should be the jealous one! You can't make stuff like this up ... or, if you did, you'd be chided by the critics for over-engineering your plot.

As for the dog, strange -- perhaps Sam was jealous because Elizabeth was watching and probably talking about it with the others, including some men...?

"Talk about impudence!"

You said it, LH. All I can say is, when Sam's had a good walk in a "most fine, hard frost," watch out ladies!

Linda F   Link to this

If only we did have Elisabeth's thoughts on her life and husband. So much was made of her parents' penury, but that followed from her father's fidelity to religious convictions. She was a child bride, Sam's equal or better by birth, a beauty, and evidently charming. She was also an accomplished horsewoman, as Sam noticed on the one early occasion she was able to travel with him. How sad that Sam was not more constant -- not only more faithful, but less given to brutality, fits, emotional cruelty (the long-ago day he destroyed all of their love letters that he could find), and other bad behavior. Don't much like the turn Sam's character has taken lately.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

She also seems to have a keen interest in natural philosophy and literature (if a bit narrow-ranged) and learning in general...She didn't pick Sir Philip Sydney as her lecture to Sam out of thin air (and didn't his squirm...and hopefully, at least faint admiration...at finding her able to match him intellectually come through). Here is our poor fool Sam chasing shopgirls and desperate carpenters' wives and mooning in fantasy over Castlemaine, a vicious, calculating, limited woman when he has a woman who is eager to be his helpmate and friend, a thousand times superior in brains and heart, lying next to him. In fairness, he's a good provider, he hasn't abandoned her as some of his time might have for a better match, and at his best moments, he clearly does love her, even admires her spirit...Unfortunately, he's for the moment wrapped up in himself and his success and convinced he has the right to amuse himself like the powerful men of the Court he envies and desperately wishes to emulate. We can hope he'll pull out of it to some extent before it's too late.

gingerd   Link to this

" to line our little bitch "

From the dark reccesses of my memory I think this should be lime but I cannot find a reference, can someone with OED help?

andy   Link to this

but read it out most frankly, but it stucke in my stomach*, and moreover I was vexed to have a dog brought to my house to line our little bitch, which they make him do in all their sights, which, God forgive me, do stir my jealousy again, though of itself the thing is a very immodest sight**.

* point (a)
** point (b)

Methinks Bess is making a point here. Sam, put (a) with (b) and you might see what she's getting at(c): She knows of your philandering and it's got to stop.

Martin   Link to this

“Thence to my bookseller’s and at his binder’s saw Hooke’s book of the Microscope, which is so pretty that I presently bespoke it,”

If I may expand on Pedro's Annotation;

The book in question is 'Micrographia' published by The Royal Society in 1664. Robert Hooke was a remarkable man, a fine artist, inventor, architect, scientist, bibliophile; he was the Curator of Experiments at the Royal Society from 1662 until 1682 and a close friend of Christopher Wren. After the Great Fire he was appointed to the post as City Surveyor, taking a leading role in the rebuilding operations.

His problem was that his mechanical and mathematical abilities, remarkable as they were, were no match for his startling insight. This, coupled with his massive workload and his many interests led to his ideas being half realised, leading the way for others, such as Newton, to expand upon his revelations. Hooke always saw these men as stealing his ideas but, in truth, he didn't have Newton's incredible mathematical genius to carry his theories on light and gravity through to completion.

Sam loved Micrographia, as we shall see in the the weeks ahead. It is a beautiful book, although many of the drawings are thought to be by Christopher Wren.

(The Man Who Measured London - Lisa Jardine)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hooke)

(http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=0DYXk_9XX38C...)

Carl in Boston   Link to this

What a great set of annotations today. I say, it quite takes my breath away. What a great way to start the day. Congratulatons to everyone.

Bradford   Link to this

"line" is the, Heaven help us, technical term; "lime" was put down to catch birds.

It is one thing for the lovelorn to look with envy upon the happy couples seen in the course of daily life; and another---after having ‘ce que je voudrais' and booked reservations for more---to be jealous of breeding canines.

cgs   Link to this

nothing to do with shooting a line
s/b in the OED "...to line our little bitch..."
Line v3:OED:
[ad. F. ligner.]

trans. Of a dog, wolf, etc.: To copulate with, to cover.
1398....
1576 TURBERV. Venerie ii. 5 From that time they beganne to haue bitches lined by that dogge and so to haue a race of them. 1687 DRYDEN Hind & P. I. 179 These last deduce him from the Helvetian kind, Who near the Leman lake his consort lined.

the other line verbs:

verb:
1. trans.
To apply a second layer of material (usually different from that of the article ‘lined’) to the inner side of (a garment; in later use, any covering or containing object); to cover on the inside.
1386...1676 WISEMAN Surg. VI. v. 423 You may use..Tin~plates lined with soft Linings to receive the fractured Member.
2. To strengthen by placing something along the side of; to reinforce, fortify. Also fig. Obs.
1599
3. To fill (one's purse, pockets, stomach, etc.) with something that may be spoken of as a lining; to cram, stuff.
1514
1625 MASSINGER New Way IV. i, I will not fail my lord... Nor I, to line My Christmas coffer. 1663 DRYDEN Wild Gallant I. i. (1725) 97 When I have lined my sides with a good dinner.

4. To cover the outside of; to overlay, drape, pad, lit. and fig.; to face (a turf-slope). Obs. exc. Naut., to add a layer of wood to.
1572...1664 POWER Exp. 481 Philos. I. 5 A fuzzy kinde of substance like little sponges, with which she [Nature] hath lined the soles of her [the fly's] feet.

6. To serve or be used as a lining for. (Cf. senses 1, 3, and 4.)
1726 SWIFT
b. transf. and fig
1649 BP. HALL Cases Consc. (1650) 132 How can you escape to be involved in a treason, lined with perjury?

2Line
[f. LINE n.1 Cf. L. l...ne ..re, F. ligner (OF. lignier), Sp. linear, It. lineare.]

1. trans. To tie with a line, string, or cord (rare); to string (a bow) (obs.).
c1375
2. To measure or test with a line, to cut to a line; also absol. Occas. fig. to reach as with a measuring-line. Obs. exc. in technical use.a1400..

3. a. (U.S.) To angle with a hook and line. rare.
1833..
b. trans. and intr. To guide or control a boat or canoe from the bank or shore of a stretch of inland water by means of a rope or ropes. N. Amer.
1907..
4. To trace with, or as with, a line or lines; to delineate, sketch. Chiefly in combination with advs. to line in: to put in with a hard pencil the permanent lines of (a freehand drawing); also, to insert (objects) in the outline of a picture. to line off: to mark off by lines. to line out: to trace the outlines of (something to be constructed); to prescribe in general outline; to forecast, adumbrate.
1600
etc.

cgs   Link to this

Our Lass Bess, be using her nogging;
Suspicion of Sam doing his version of covering
without being caught in the act, would cause more problems than they be worth.
Humans can use their grey matter , but must think of the long term consequences, it be no good having an out an out drawn out fight verbal or physical, no matter how temporary satisfying , would not solve the fight for having a good life. Today we have modern means of solving this issue, but it has taken a few centuries of adjustments of equality.
Bess sees wot it be like, living in restricted circumstances, one has to balance one hurt for another.
Thru Samuell we see the eternal struggle of one mind [male]with another [female], it would be nice not to have conflict of interests, but that is not way of life.

The bottom line is to satisfy thy external and internal senses without losing thy life.

So here to day 1665 how one hints without getting another black eye.

Another be writhing a nursery rhyme.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"The dog? You were...Jealous of the dog?"

"Look at it this way, Bess. Bagwell femme, Mrs. Martin, dog...It's got to make you feel...Bess,wait! You said my preserving the Diary to preserve your memory earned my redemption! Bess, there's no throwing chamber pots in Heaven!"

cape henry   Link to this

[somehow missing from my comment above] This is the second instance I recall of Elizabeth using a literary source as an intermediary to facilitate discussion of difficult personal issues with Sam. This may also shed light on her 'decision' to stay at home until Easter.

cgs   Link to this

In the passed comments; Samuell had no problems with the mating game
"..leaving my wife to look after her little bitch, which was just now a-whelping..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/08/18/
more on whelping
"...tells me that the bitch has whelped four young ones and is very well after it, my wife having had a great fear that she would die thereof, the dog that got them being very big...."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/08/19/
more on bitch and covering , lining and related problems

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/03/22/

Here here Samuell helps in lining up one with the other,
Gossip be here;
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/03/23/

Pedro   Link to this

Life of Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

Something else he wrote…

Astrophil and Stella, which includes 108 sonnets and 11 songs, is the first in the long line of Elizabethan sonnet cycles. Most of the sonnets are influenced by Petrarchan conventions — the abject lover laments the coldness of his beloved lady towards him, even though he is so true of love and her neglect causes him so much anguish.

http://trustedvm.com/renlit/sidbio.htm

Pedro   Link to this

The Guinea Company.

The king, who considered the company to be of great importance to the colonial trade, and who realized his own intimate connection with its formation, declared on January 2, 1665, that he was resolved "to assist, protect & preserve the said company in the prosecution of their said trade," a declaration which was tantamount to war…

Although the company had not obtained as much money as had been hoped for in the last subscription, it anticipated great success in its trade, until vague rumors began to circulate that Admiral DeRuyter had been sent to Africa to undo the conquest made by Captain Holmes. In the last part of December, 1664, these rumors were confirmed. In a petition to the king of January 2, 1665, the company declared that its trade had already increased to such an extent that over one hundred ships were employed, and that a yearly return of from two to three hundred thousand pounds might reasonably be expected.

The Journal of Negro History, Volume 4, 1919
by Various Authors

Vince   Link to this

A very busy day. How did Sam manage to fit so much in a day and still have time some where to write up his diary for the day. I guess he could be partially writing the diary during the day & the next day complete yesterday’s entry before writing up that day. Anyway he seems to keep on top of the diary writing; the writing seems very fresh in his mind & how great it is to be allowed entry into an intelligent mind from 1660's London. By the ways thanks also some of the annotators today for giving me a number fresh insights to help me to interpret what is going on in both Beth’s & Sam’s mind & lives.

Pedro   Link to this

For Jeannine

I saw the Blazing Star again about 6 o’clock at night observed him distant from Os Baleni 13° 43´, 3rd star in Ore Baleni 12° 25´, Upper Horn of Aries 12° 17´. His stream and body was like unto the last appearance or rather weaker.

The Journal of Edward Montagu edited by Anderson

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...being forced to pay a great deale of money away in boxes (that is, basins at White Hall),..."

Was this a form of giving Christmas Boxes (i.e. money presents to servants and tradespersons) ?? Or cash down for some navy requisite?

This entry reads like stream of consciousness fiction or a tape of someone's thoughts. It really is startling that Sam can write and compose as he does as if it is just all happening before him. Just amazing stuff. And much copied by fiction writers - The Diary of a Nobody (a great favourite of mine) was mentioned recently in these annotations and I also would remind readers of The Diary of a Provincial Lady (another fav. read) and Elizabeth and her German Garden - I am sure all these authors owe a lot of Sam, but his was not fiction, but something just marvellous. It is to be relished like the best Belgian chocolates or good Burgundy. What a wonder. The juxtaposition of Sam's sniffing after women as if they are bitches on heat with the actual event in the bestial sense at the end of the day and also Elizabeth's pointed use of Sir P.S. Wonderful, wonderful.

Capt. Petrus.S. Dorpmans   Link to this

4-6 January 1665.

I thence to the Coffee-house there, but little company; and so home to the Change, where I hear of some more of our ships lost to the Northward.

Two ships were taken off Bridlington: The Newes, 5 January p.16.

cgs   Link to this

'twas why Boxing day be Boxing day [Dec 26th], 'twas time to sweeten up thems folks that lift their 'titfer' and prevent thee from getting lost and muddied and run down to the corner shop for that little sumert.
"“…being forced to pay a great deale of money away in boxes (that is, basins at White Hall),…”"
Now it be called Christmas bonus time.

Capt.Petrus.Dorpmans   Link to this

2nd.Jan.1665.

"...where I occasioned much mirth with a ballet I brought with me, made from the seaman at sea to their ladies in town; saying Sir W.Pen, Sir G. Ascue, and Sir J. Lawson made them..."

There can be no reasonable cause for doubting this to refer to the famous song, "To all you ladies now at land,"written by Lord Buckhurst (afterwards Earl of Dorset),and the reference has therefore avery distinct literary value, because it proves that the song was not "made the before the engagement"of June 3rd, 1665, an opinion which was universally held until this passage was printed. There is nothing in the song itself to indicate any particular time when it was written, and it appears that the first to fix the exact period was Prior the poet (who was born in 1664). In the dedication of his poems to Lionel, Earl of Dorset and Middlesex, Prior states that the earl's father wrote the celebrated sea song "the night before the engagement with the Dutch in 1665." Dr. Johnson, in his "Lives of the Poets,"says, "seldom any splendid story is wholly true,änd adds that Lord Orrery told him that Lord Buckhurst had been a week employed upon it, and only retouched or finished it on the memorable evening. Lord Braybrooke was criticised for supposing that pepys referred to Buckhurst's song, and therefore he enterd fully into his own defence, summing up as follows: "In the absence of certain evidence, we cannot decide upon the fact: but all accounts agree in representing Buckhurst as having served as a volunteer under the Duke of York, whose first cruise took place in November, 1664. perhaps, then the ballad was written at this time, when an action between the two fleets was only delayed by the Dutch retiring to port. Thus Pepys might well have seen the song in January, 1664-65; and it still may have been retouched, and brought out with éclat during the excitement consequent upon the victory of June 3rd following. Nor is it, indeed, easy to imagine that anyone ever wrote a balled when about to take part in agreat naval conflict; or that, if two songs had been contempporaneously composed on the same subject, with titles so nearly identical, one only should be known to exist."
The song became popular immediately, and has never lost its popularity. An immense number of imitations have appeared, and reference to some of these is made by the Rev. J.W. Ebsworth in his valuable edition of the "Bagford Ballads"(p.615).

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