Thursday 19 April 1660

A great deal of business all this day, and Burr being gone to shore without my leave did vex me much.

At dinner news was brought us that my Lord was chosen at Dover. This afternoon came one Mr. Mansell on board as a Reformado, to whom my Lord did shew exceeding great respect, but upon what account I do not yet know. This day it has rained much, so that when I came to go to bed I found it wet through, so I was fain to wrap myself up in a dry sheet, and so lay all night.

8 Annotations

Susanna   Link to this

Sixty Pieces of Silver

During the epic escape to the continent in 1651, Charles II's companions "fixed up a boat with a merchant named Francis Mansell, by the simple expedient of getting him drunk: the payment was to be sixty pieces of silver. Officially, his cargo was billed as a party of illegal duelists." (Antonia Fraser, "Royal Charles")

vincent   Link to this

"fain" meaning happy,pleased, seems to fit, other meanigs too, had to look it up.

WKW   Link to this

or fain as "obliged, compelled, forced"
or a combination (all "archaic")

Joe   Link to this

Bed wetting
So it didn't occur to Sam to have someone fix the leak after last time...

Pauline   Link to this

It is odd, isn't it, Joe
I wonder if the remodeling to put a better chimney in for Montagu's chamber is to blame.

vincent   Link to this

"fain" It depends how one does view ship board life in the English Channel in march. Bartle.com provides the the following
fain ADJECTIVE: Archaic. Disposed to accept or agree.

My Ancestors   Link to this

During the epic escape to the continent in 1651, Charles II’s companions “fixed up a boat with a merchant named Francis Mansell, by the simple expedient of getting him drunk: the payment was to be sixty pieces of silver. Officially, his cargo was billed as a party of illegal duelists.”

That is likely to be wrong. Charles would have never shown Francis respect on his return as Francis boarded his ship to greet him along with another person of repute. Francis also wasn't likely a Frenchman either quite possibly he was a kinsman of Sir Robert (Lord Admiral of the narrow seas - English Channel)and had access to coal ships as part of his glass house business and trader with Italy and Europe - Francis procured a coal steamer# also this Francis would have then therefore been a kinsman with another Francis an ardent royalist doctor of divinity at Oxford University #Ejected by parliamentarian puritans - The Francis of Oxford being the nephew of Sir Robert#. The fact that these kinsmen were royalist Welsh #Although the name is Norman origin circa 1260 into southern Wales# had benefited from Charles 1 and then Charles 2 on his return #E.g. benefacting Oxford Jesus cllge) makes me think there is more than a passing connection on all this, in those times there was ample reason to confuscate the truth, Francis the merchant was buried in England and his surname as with his kinsmen has no legacy in France as is an anglicised name.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

We're within view of Calais http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/04/17/ and still messengers and poiticos go back and forth to England. We are sailing slowly.

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